Our Blogs

THE PLASTICS PREDICAMENT

By Sujata Koirala
Dec 04, 2023

Plastic, a great invention, has significantly transformed our way of life, However, the extensive and pervasive use of plastic in our daily lives has escalated to the point where it is causing detrimental environmental issues. It's hard to imagine life without plastic because it's everywhere, making things convenient. But the issue is that using so much plastic, especially in the huge amounts we do now, isn't good for the planet. So, how did we end up using so much, and what can we do about it? That's the big question we need to figure out. The Rise of Plastic: A Double-Edged Sword The first plastic bottle designed for holding carbonated drinks was patented in 1973. It is very surprising and interesting that it didn’t happen that long ago when we think about very important milestones such an era of the Beatles, the introduction of color television, and even the age of rocketships. Now, these plastic bottles are everywhere, from backpacks to desks all around the world. It's a reminder of how quickly innovations can become a regular part of our daily lives. If we see in terms of Nepal, plastics were not so much common till the 90s. When came into existence, plastics as a product impacted the usage of eco-friendly materials. Plastics were considered as a cheap and easy commodity. The result of which increased the plastic usage in Nepal in a heavy way. The once pristine Bagmati, now bears the burden of bottles and plastics, an unforeseen turn of events that showcases the drastic impact of this polymer wave in the country. As per ICIMOD, Nepal produces 2.7 tons of plastic waste every day, creating pollution in the streets, rivers, forests, and even in the might Himalayas. The plastic waste from Nepal’s river basins travels through the Terai region and reaches the Ganges in India, ultimately flowing into the Bay of Bengal. This cross-border plastic flow is causing disruptions to the global ocean ecology as well. Unpacking Our Plastic Predicament What plastic does offer is the range of physical properties such as strength, heat resistance or electrical conductivity by its polymers. The main problem is that the nature of synthetic polymers that is not readily recognized by the bacteria responsible for decomposing things. Unless we, as a society, cut down on our plastic use and find better ways to handle the waste we create, there's a serious risk of our Earth and oceans transforming into a plastic swamp. Unfortunately, we haven't been doing a great job of facing up to this challenge so far. It's a problem that urgently needs our attention and action. Understanding how we arrived at this juncture is crucial for envisioning a sustainable path forward. The convenience of single-use plastics, coupled with a lack of widespread awareness about their long-term consequences, contributed to a culture of disposability. As a result, our reliance on plastic reached unprecedented levels, and the consequences are now impossible to ignore. Charting a Course for Change: What Can Be Done? The urgency of our plastic predicament demands proactive and decisive action. Embracing sustainable alternatives, reducing single-use plastic consumption, and advocating for responsible waste management practices are critical steps. There are various global commitments that have now come into action that paves a way towards the sustainable use of plastics. Uniting 1,000 organisations, the New Plastics Economy has been exploring how to create a circular economy for plastics. Initiated by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in the UK, it is based on three principles: that we should eliminate the plastics we don’t need; innovate so that the plastics we do produce are reusable, recyclable or compostable; and that all plastic items should circulate within the economy. In October 2018, the New Plastics Economy and the UN Environment Programme launched the Global Commitment, designed to realize this vision by uniting governments, NGOs, universities, industry associations, and investors around a common cause. Also, the European Union’s Green Deal is the EU’s main new growth strategy to transition the EU economy to a sustainable economic model. Presented in December 2019, the overarching objective of the EU Green Deal is for the EU to become the first climate-neutral continent by 2050, resulting in a cleaner environment, more affordable energy, smarter transport, new jobs and an overall better quality of life. In Nepal, since 1997 there has also been a lot of legislative formulations to combat plastic pollution. In May 2022, the government of Nepal unveiled a comprehensive Action Plan aimed at prohibiting the use of plastic bags. The plan delineated four key strategies, including measures to restrict the import of plastic bags or related products with a thickness less than 40 microns. Additionally, it proposed a ban on the import of single-use plastic bags thinner than 40 microns. To support businesses in adopting more sustainable practices, the government planned to provide grants for the procurement of machinery capable of producing plastic bags with a thickness exceeding 40 microns, as well as eco-friendly substitute bags. Furthermore, a pivotal aspect of the strategy involved encouraging individuals to embrace the use of their own eco-friendly bags during shopping activities. Fostering a cultural shift towards a circular economy – where plastics are designed for reuse and recycling – can play a pivotal role in mitigating the environmental impact of our plastic dependence.Educating communities, businesses, and policymakers about the implications of our plastic consumption is paramount. By cultivating awareness and championing innovative solutions, we can collectively steer towards a future where the benefits of plastic are harnessed without compromising the health of our planet. In the face of this complex challenge, a multifaceted approach is essential. As we grapple with the consequences of our plastic-laden past, there is an opportunity to reshape our relationship with this versatile material and forge a more sustainable future for generations to come.

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Waste Smart Schools in Madhesh

By Deeji Maharjan
Nov 17, 2023

Madhesh welcomed us with the never-ending plains, eye-catching view, a pleasant greenery and a promise for a better tomorrow. Our journey to Madhesh started with a sense of purpose and a commitment to continue our work in promoting waste management, recycling, and occupational safety. It was a journey that not only gave an understanding about occupational safety to the informal waste workers but also motivated students to be responsible towards the waste management and environment. Our mission was to empower and educate. Occupational safety is one of the most important things, especially for those who work tirelessly in the informal waste sector. We conducted occupational safety training sessions in five different recycling centers across Madhesh. The waste workers got familiar with the term occupational safety, understanding the importance of safeguarding themselves against occupational hazards in their workplace. The safety equipment like safety helmets, gloves, masks, goggles, reflector jacket and shoes were distributed in each recycling center. As we continued to give training sessions in different sites, it became evident that there is need for greater recognition and appreciation of the dedicated informal waste workers who consistently work to reduce environmental impacts and advance the cause of a circular economy. For the next phase of our journey, we set out to inaugurate the Waste Smart program in three government schools in Madhesh. Along with the formation of Waste Smart Clubs, each consisting of 11 students with the students taking their roles seriously, showcasing their dedication to creating a cleaner and greener environment. Each school received recycle bins, notice boards, seed money and Waste Smart Club kit filled with necessary tools and materials to organize waste management related programs. The session was followed by oath taking ceremony as the students took the oath to better manage waste in their surroundings and to take their responsibilities toward the environment with their commitment. Also, the students were aware of the growing plastic pollution in their locality and were willing to address such problems in their locality. This showcased their eagerness to learn, grow, and dedicate themselves to building a more environmentally sustainable future.

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Experience of interacting with informal sectors

By Sapana Sharma
Oct 09, 2023

The informal sector primarily revolves around the waste management industry, where individuals engage in the collection, sorting, and sale of recyclable materials to generate income. These informal workers operate independently, without direct ties to formal organizations or sectors. My encounter with these waste workers and participants in the informal sector was a truly eye-opening experience. It shed light on the distinctive manner in which they conduct their tasks, their unique work processes, their work environments, and the way they are perceived and treated by both society and local authorities. Despite their pivotal role in managing waste, a crucial aspect of urban life, they are often marginalized and stigmatized. Local governments sometimes subject them to discrimination, even prohibiting their access to certain areas. This restrictive treatment is due in part to the unfortunate involvement of some informal sector workers in unlawful activities. In our discussions, these individuals candidly shared the hardships they face on a daily basis. They are frequently denied their basic rights, and their children encounter resistance when attempting to enroll in boarding schools, despite their parents' financial capability. The desire to embark on entrepreneurial endeavors remains largely unrealized due to inadequate financial support, compelling them to accept low-paying jobs. Furthermore, they often struggle to receive regular and fair compensation for their hard work. Regrettably, their significant contributions to society frequently go unnoticed, with many people unfairly branding them as thieves and using derogatory terms to refer to them. This issue extends beyond waste workers, affecting even the owners of Informal Recycling Centers (IRCs). It is disheartening that these individuals find themselves accused of deeds they have not committed and are readily judged by society. Local authorities often take action without concrete evidence. Notably, many of these informal workers reside in the locality of the Bagmati corridor area, where these challenges are particularly prevalent.

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Health concerns of Plastic

By Labisha Basnet
Oct 06, 2023

Plastics are made up of polymer and can be molded, extruded, or pressed into any objects of various shapes. Plastics have been used widely across the globe as it is easy to manufacture, cost effective and is of longer durability. When we look around, we can find at least 4 materials made from plastic, the chair you are sitting in, the phone cover you carry around, the pen you are writing with or the food package you are snacking in. The world has been enjoying plastic but foreseen the epidemic of plastics. Plastic contains and drains hazardous chemicals that have potential to affect human health as well as the environment. Plastic pose Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that threatens human health by disrupting the body’s hormone system. EDCs can lead to neurological impairment in the development of children and of fetuses, reproductive disorders, cancer and diabetes. Exposure to plastics during pregnancy has also been found to increase the risk of birth complications, lung patches and childhood cancer. Long term exposure to plastic particles and its associates have shown to exhaust thyroid endocrine function by weakening its drivers. Human health risks from plastics are due to monomeric building blocks of plastic namely bisphenol A, their additives such as plasticizers or from their combination. Bisphenol A (BPA) is best known as the monomeric building block of polycarbonate plastics. However, it is also used frequently as an additive to other plastics such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC). During the polymerization of BPA some of the monomers are left unbound and these unbound molecules can be released from food containers into food over time. The draining process of molecules is also accelerated by repeated washing of containers and when storing in them acidic or basic items that break down the polymer. As a result, reusable water bottles, baby bottles, and the inner linings of food cans, all made by using BPA, are known to drain the controversial monomer into food over time. Therefore, to prevent plastic epidemic it is crucial to embrace ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives.

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E-waste and its impacts

By Sapana Sharma
Sep 15, 2023

E-waste is one of the fastest-growing waste in the world. With the innovation of modern technology, the use of Electric and Electronic Equipment (EEE) is increasing rapidly. Advancement of technologies and innovation of new hi-tech leads to e-waste generation. Electronic devices have made our lives easier, however, there are hazardous sides to it too. Electronic waste is often disassembled by poorly paid locals in hazardous methods using dangerous chemicals to separate its components. The chemicals end up in many different locations, exposing the areas to toxic chemicals present in the e-waste, which causes severe health impacts to humans. More than 50 million metric tons of e-waste is generated globally every year. Till now only 17 percent of total generated waste has been recycled (Global E-waste Monitor,2020), As per the report, the global volume increased by 21% in the past five years. Nepal produces 28 metric kiloton of waste in a year. An average Nepali generates approx. 900 gm of e-waste.  Any devices which come to an end of life become electronic waste. Simply, electronic waste or end of life refers to the devices that are discarded after a certain period of lifespan. As per U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), electronic equipments are divided into different categories such as large home appliances, small home appliances, IT equipment and telecommunications, Consumer equipment, Lighting equipment, Toys and sports equipment, medical devices, monitoring and control instruments and automatic dispenser. Regardless of such massive generation of e-waste and its hazardous aspects to human health and environment, concern authorities haven’t taken any action. Still, we lack proper laws and legislation to address such issues. There are few private sectors who are working in e-waste management, among them Doko recyclers is one. In present scenario, E-waste collection and handling is carried out by informal sectors in Nepal. Since 1996, Nepal became a signatory member of Basel Convention, which bars the transboundary movement of hazardous waste and its disposal, still there is illegal practice of sending hazardous waste to India. Improper e-waste management practice causes serious impacts to the environment and human health. E-waste disposal and burning in the open space can damage the soil, water, and air because it includes harmful compounds. Impact of electronic waste E-waste has a composition of different chemicals such as lead, mercury, lithium, beryllium and so on. Plastic items, such as polyvinyl chloride cables and plastic casings, are also poisonous and can cause harm in addition to metal parts. Exposure to such high levels of contaminants leads to sever health issues such as miscarriages, neurological disorders, cancers and so on. Common routes for exposure to the toxins involve human handling of electronic waste during various management operations such incineration, disposal in unhygienic landfills, or melting down procedures. For instance, the dumping of e-waste in unclean landfills can result in the release of toxic leachate into groundwater and the exposure of land and aquatic species to associated health concerns. Both domesticated animals and wild animals can swallow e-waste by drinking contaminated water directly or indirectly through plants. Challenges In general scenario of Nepal, e-waste is treated like solid waste (Giri et.al,2020). How to manage e- waste in the proper way is a major challenge. Normally people sell their unused or discarded waste to the informal sector which later on ended up on landfill sites. As we lack provision regarding e-waste management and its handling. Suggestion E-waste doesn’t include hazardous components only, rather it also has valuable resources such as metal, gold, platinum, copper. Different research signifies circular economy. Informal sector is doing this for long period of time. They send their valuable resources out of the country. More importantly, we need to think about a sustainable way to manage electronic waste. Applying 3R (Reduce, Reuse and recycle) policy, Government should develop policies and legislation regarding e-waste management. To provide financial aid to businesses who are working on e-waste management.

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Field Story from Chitwan

By Hannah Hoefle
Sep 01, 2023

This August, the Creasion team organized a field trip to Chitwan in order to welcome five new schools into the Waste Smart School initiative as part of the Recycler Saathi project together with goodwill ambassador Parakram Rana and actress Shilpa Maskey. The visit to the local office also gave the colleagues from Kathmandu the chance to spend a day with the Chitwan chapter of Volunteer For Change and create the yearly curriculum with the Waste Smart School Teachers. The trip was kicked off by a day with the young volunteers in Chitwan who were eager to share their experiences and impressions from working on local recycling initiatives. During an interactive session on the concept of circular economies and plastic circularity in Nepal, the volunteers got to discuss their new insights on sustainable development practices. During this session, they also brainstormed a variety of long-term approaches to move towards circular economies in Nepal. They then got to implement the new learnings creatively by developing innovative business ideas in smaller teams, and even had the unique chance to pitch their ideas to Mr. Aanand Mishra, Founder and President of Creasion; Ms. Sujata Koirala, General Secretary of Creasion; Mr. Parakram Rana, Goodwill Ambassador of Creasion; and Ms. Shilpa Maskey, a renowned artist and actress of Nepal. During the afternoon, the volunteers also got to engage with the senior management and celebrity guests through keynote speeches and Q&A sessions. The successful and intensive day was concluded by photo opportunities with the celebrity guests and dinner at Creasion’s Innovation Hub. Over the following two days, the Creasion teams from Chitwan and Kathmandu, graced by the presence of our celebrity guests, had the honor of visiting and participating in the inaugurations of five schools to recycler Saathi’s Waste Smart School program. By joining this program, the schools share a Memorandum of Understanding with Creasion on implementing recycling practices and engaging their students through Waste Smart Clubs. Each club consist of eleven highly motivated students who are committed to raising awareness on the importance of recycling. During the inauguration, the club members and their fellow students participated in an oath taking ceremony and received the necessary equipment to set up their clubs, such as Waste Smart School Club kits, dustbins, notice boards, and seed money. Thanks to Janajagriti Secondary School, Ratnanagar-14; Dwarikadas Secondary School, Ratnanagar-14; Malpur Secondary School, Sauraha, Ratnanagar-7; Shree Bishwa Prakash Secondary School, Bharatpur-15; and Shree Rastriya Adharbhut Bidhalaya, Bharatpur-4, the Waste Smart School initiative is able to expand its reach to the distinguished schools and communities. This way, students from a young age get to learn about the importance of environmental protection practices such as sustainable waste management, engage with their peers and communities by implementing recycling practices, and enhance their educational experience by participating in Waste Smart Clubs.

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Horeca Expansion

By Ritesh Raj Gurung
Aug 31, 2023

Kathmandu is a place of opportunities, people from all walks of life, and different cultures. Knowing this there are Hotels, Restaurants, Cafes, and Entertainment Hubs that cater to this population, meaning a lot of waste PET plastic bottles. This is where the HoReCa initiative comes in. After thorough planning and a lot of discussions, we started the HoReCa initiative where we would collect and pay the partnered institutions a certain rate for their collected bottles. Initially, I underestimated this initiative as we know that the municipality and local waste vendors manage and circulate the waste plastic. However, much to my surprise, the HoReCas were quite informed about waste PET plastic. So much so that some of the institutions did ask us whether we are only using the plastic for profit. When we gave them our pitch, they were greatly inclined to give us their waste PET bottles. We developed 25 partnerships out of which 60% free extractions and 40% paid extractions. On average we would collect 90kgs to 175 kgs from the established partnered institutions. Looking at the way institutions function, we can greatly make a difference when it comes to making different HoReCas and entertainment hubs Waste Smart. Imagine the difference we can make with greater partnerships!

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My experience as an intern at Creasion

By Hannah Hoefle
Aug 30, 2023

My name is Hannah, I am a 24 year old Masters student in Disaster Risk Management and Climate Change Adaptations at Lund University, and I’m currently enjoying the immensely valuable experience of spending my internship period at Creasion in Kathmandu. While I have lived and traveled abroad before, this is actually my first time discovering Asia. So I started talking to friends who have traveled in Nepal before to get an idea of what to expect during my 3-month stay. Still, after all these conversations it felt to me like I’m just getting bits and pieces and I struggled to put together a complete picture of what to expect. After finally arriving in Kathmandu at the beginning of August, I understood why: It was impossible to properly put into words all the impressions and experiences waiting for me. Over the first weeks, I sent extensive voice messages and countless photos to my family and friends, trying to explain what the energy in this city is like, how welcoming the people are, how amazing the food at lunch in the office tasted, how overwhelmed I was crossing a big street for the first time, the joy of being greeted by the street dogs on my corner once they started recognizing me, the sound of monsoon rain on the balcony roof with the bells from offering rituals ringing through, and exploring the maze-like streets on the back of the countless scooters in this city. I am beyond grateful for the colleagues at Creasion who are helping me navigate these new experiences. They have made me feel welcome at the office from day one and I immediately got the chance to dive into the projects. It’s a great environment to learn more about working in an NGO and also the general working culture in Nepal, as both of these are new contexts to me, and my colleagues are so open in answering all of my questions. In my first week, I already joined an event during which university students from different backgrounds participated in a presentation competition on plastic circularity. It was amazing to learn about the different perspectives from their academic fields and experience the students sharing their passion for innovative approaches to sustainability in Nepal. Shortly after, I had the joy of facilitating a workshop of my own, this time focusing on how to write a CV with the group of young students from Volunteer For Change. I was positively overwhelmed by their motivation, interest, and initiative, and it was incredibly gratifying to learn about youth empowerment in practice this way. I’m already looking forward to the next sessions where we will talk about how to write cover letters and practice for job interviews. I’m also working on conducting literature research and learning a lot about the circular economy of plastics, as well as how to educate schoolchildren about climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction. I got the chance to implement these learnings into preparing a presentation for young students at one of Creasion’s Waste Smart Schools. These insights are helping me prepare for my Master’s thesis already, and I’m excited to learn more about Creasion’s different projects over the next few weeks!

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My VFC Journey

By Labisha Basnet
Aug 16, 2023

Two years ago, I joined VFC. It turned out to be the greatest choice.I have actively participated in numerous events where I have learned and evolved thanks to VFC. VFC has consistently offered capacity development for who we are. It has aided in our development and to reach our full potential. Waste care workers recognition 2022 This was my first program where I got involved in planning and execution of the event. The excitement and enthusiasm for this even was over the top. I have never seen or heard of any company who honour wastecare workers before. The amount of hard work that the team has put into for making sure all the waste care workers feels recognized is remarkable. One of my core memory of this event which I know I will cherish for my life is when our waste care workers burst into happiness while receiving the award and said “ Today even I brought medal, I can show my family that even I am honored” . Words are inadequate to capture the moment of this day. Swap your plastics 2022 In order to prevent the clastrophic incidents its our duty to mitigate and minimize the effects that are foreseen. The event of Swapping your plastic with plant was held on patan on the occasion of world environment day,June 5 2022 by CREASION Nepal and Recycler saathi. Our motive of the program was to promote behavioural change in regardes to Recycle,reuse and reduce. I was quite unsure if we will be able to collect 100 bottles but turns out we collected 1000+ bottles.People bringing plastics were given seeds and plants in exchange.Every one visiting was positive on how plastics harm the environment. This event in my personal level helped to minimize the use of plastics. .

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Sharing my Volunteering Experience at CREASION

By Janney Kayastha
Jul 26, 2023

Since last 4 months I have been the member of VFC and volunteered with Creasion. I got a chance to participate in various activities such as organizing and conducting awareness sessions on waste reduction and proper waste disposal, and assisting in waste sorting and recycling efforts. 'Trash to Treasure' was the first program which I volunteered and after that I got a chance to volunteer during Hamro cycle yatra on June 3rd which was completely a new type of program for me where I experienced a lot of new things and new learnings. I was also the part of 'Swap your plastic' program which was held on the occasion of World Environment Day on June 5th. I was extremely happy to do the face paint as a part of program and making the cute innocent kids smile .It was a hands-on experience where I got to work with a diverse group of volunteers and make a positive impact on our environment. I enjoyed a lot during these two events as we prepared a flash mob too. I even got a chance to volunteer during National Colloquium where we learned a lot about plastics and plastic pollution. I was also a part of Waste Smart School and got an opportunity to present about "know your waste" to the students of two government schools. During this period I learned a lot about the importance of waste management and how small actions can lead to significant changes.I even got a chance to participate in various workshops which was very effective. Besides learning a lots of new things, I have had a lot of fun working with other volunteers. I met some good friends, sisters and brothers and the bond we share is just incredible. From playing with the kids to attending big seminars, the overall experience of volunteering was remarkable!

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The Birth of Plastic : The beginning of the plastic revolution

By Sushila Shrestha
Jul 21, 2023

In todays world, Plastic has enjoyed exceptional growth and unparalleled dominance in the market, both in terms of its production and consumption. Human lifestyle and material consumption pattern has shown such remarkable change over the last 60 years in adopting plastic material that it has now reached into every aspect of our lives (2) From a tiny toothbrush to mighty computers, and most of the lifesaving advances of modern medicine and outer space pursuits, the plastic material dominants all. Widespread use of plastic has revolutionized manufacturing, making products more accessible and affordable to people worldwide. While its significance cannot be denied, the environmental impact of plastic waste remains a pressing challenge that calls for innovative solutions and responsible usage to ensure a sustainable future. Originated from the Greek word "plastikos," this word “plastic” is something can be easily shaped or molded. The first synthetic polymer was invented in 1869 by John Wesley Hyatt, who was inspired by a New York firm’s offer of $10,000 for anyone who could provide a substitute for ivory. The growing popularity of billiards had put a strain on the supply of natural ivory, obtained through the slaughter of wild elephants. The material invented by Hyatt could be crafted into a variety of shapes and made to imitate natural substances like tortoiseshell, horn, linen, and ivory. Hence, when the polymer was introduced, it was ironically considered as the ‘savior of the elephants and tortoise’. The plastics revolution was only getting started. After the discovery of the synthetic plastic, for the first-time human manufacturing was not constrained by the limits of nature. Nature had a limit to the amount of the wood, metal, stone, bone, tusk, and horn that it could supply. But now humans could create new raw materials. This development helped not only people but also the environment. The creation of new materials helped free people from the social and economic constraints imposed by the scarcity of natural resources. Material possession became much cheaper and more obtainable. In 1907 Leo Baekeland invented Bakelite, the first fully synthetic plastic, meaning it contained no molecules found in nature. In pursuit of a synthetic substitute for shellac, a natural electrical insulator, Baekeland invented the material and named it Bakelite. The insulating property, durability, heat resistance, and its affordability ideally suited for mechanical mass production. Bakelite was marketed as “the material of a thousand uses,” as it could be shaped or molded into almost anything, providing endless possibilities. This was just the beginning of the plastic revolution. Soon, Hyatt’s and Baekeland’s successes led major chemical companies to invest in the research and development of new polymers, and new plastics joined celluloid and Bakelite family. In World War II, the plastic material consumption and production became more revolutionary. Nylon, synthetic silk, was used for parachutes, ropes, body armor, helmet liners, and more. Plexiglas was used as an alternative to glass for aircraft windows. The World War II led to the plastic production in the United States increased by 300% as with plastics, material production was much cheaper and convenient. (1) After the war, the industry continued to expand during the 1950s and 1960s. Almost every natural product was no longer essential to manufacturing processes. From car manufacturing to packaging and furniture, plastics were used everywhere. Plastic items were marketed as ‘luxurious’, ‘comfortable’ and ‘fashionable’. Single use packaging and cutleries were marketed to women and housewives as a respite from household chores and mundane activities. However, soon the unblemished optimism about plastics didn’t last. In the postwar years, there was a shift in perceptions as plastics were no longer seen as unambiguously positive. Plastic debris in the oceans was first observed in the 1960s, a decade in which people started becoming aware of environmental problems. As awareness about environmental issues spread, the persistence of plastic waste, its non-degradability and its ominous presence began to trouble observers. Environmental concerns regarding its management post use and its slow degradability became the major issue. Despite growing mistrust, plastics have become a critical part of our modern life. It has made possible the development of computers, cell phones, and most of the lifesaving advances of modern medicine. Lightweight and good for insulation, plastics help save fossil fuels used in heating and in transportation. Perhaps most important, inexpensive plastics raised the standard of living and made material abundance more readily available. Replacing natural materials with plastic has made many of our possessions cheaper, lighter, safer, and stronger. The light weight and flexible nature of plastics. Its use has made some of our wildest scientific ventures come true like spaceship, health and safety and modern technology. Since it’s clear that plastics have a valuable place in our lives, it is our responsibility to make plastics safer and more sustainable in the longer run.

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Fire Safety Training

By CREASION
Jul 03, 2023

A comprehensive fire safety training, specifically focused on firefighting techniques, was recently organized for our dedicated baling staff, sorting unit staff, and the Regional team. As part of the training initiative, a fire extinguisher system was also installed at our esteemed regional office. Through this training program, we aimed to educate our baling staff, sorting unit staff, and the Regional team about the various aspects of fire safety, including fire prevention techniques, early detection methods, proper usage of fire extinguishers, and evacuation procedures. Recognizing the paramount significance of safeguarding the well-being of our waste workers at their job sites, CREASION has diligently organized Fire Safety Training sessions as a pivotal component of their comprehensive training program. These specialized training are thoughtfully designed to fortify and equip our waste workers with the necessary knowledge and skills, ensuring they remain resilient and well-prepared in the face of potential hazards. By prioritizing their safety, we aim to foster a secure and protected environment, elevating the standard of occupational training across various fields and occupations.

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My Experience as a Volunteer at CREASION

By Rubina Neupane
Jun 30, 2023

My name is Rubina Neupane. I am nineteen and currently studying Bachelor in Environment Science, first year at Tri-Chandra Multiple Campus. I am a proud VFC(Volunteering for Change) member. As member of VFC, I have participated and volunteered different programs like ‘Hamro Cycle Yatra’ with the moto “Dignity for all” for the recognition of Waste workers , ‘ Swap Your Plastic’ program held on this World Environment Day to create awareness in the community about recycling organized by CREASION Nepal. Similarly, I had also got a chance to participate in a workshop "Know Your Plastic" which was again organized by CREASION Nepal. I had also volunteered a program on this International Youth Day organized by CREASION Nepal which is based on presentation and Idea sharing Competition on ' Circular Economy Of Plastics' with the moto of "Green skills for Youth". In sum , I had also got a chance to work as a volunteer/Project enumerator at RIPL project focuses on enhancing the capacity of women in the informal recycling sector and increasing the recyclability of plastics to prevent them from entering into the rivers in collaborative effort between GRID-Arendal , The Norweigian Geotechnical Institute(NGI), CREASION Nepal, The International Solid Waste Association(ISWA) , DOKO Recycler and SASAJA. All these program had taught me different life lessons and skills which further increases my self confidence, improves my communication and leadership skill as well. During "Hamro Cycle Yatra" there was a participation of 150 plus waste workers and this program was held for their recognition in this society. This program had taught me that Every individual in this society are really important and serve the community in their best way possible. So everyone must be treated equally and must be recognized. During this program , I had got a chance to know how programs can be conducted in a properly managed way , how teamwork plays a crucial role in any programs. During "Swap your Plastic" program I'd experience how different people can be connected through a single program for the good cause. This program shows that people are conscious about the changes that we must start for the sustainable and ecofriendly lifestyle. During 'Know Your Plastic' session I had got a chance to learn about how plastics evolved and took whole world into convenient option ignoring all the hazardous impact that plastic creates. I had learnt to segregate plastics according to their RIC code and so on . This program taught why alternative must be developed to completely eradicate plastic use otherwise it is not possible to say "No to Plastics". Likewise, During volunteering the program "Circular Economy Of plastics" there were the participation of Youths from different educational background like Law, Public Health , Environmental Science, Social Work and so on and every groups had given different solutions , laws to be made and empowering any other youth like us to reduce, reuse or recycling plastic wastes. This program was so wholesome where every Youth brings their thoughts and ideas for the better future . Having keen interest on serving environment , I had also got a chance to work as a project enumerator at DOKO Recyclers in a RIPL project which aims to reduce plastic waste going to the rivers in Nepal. During this one month project, we had outreached more than 15 different places of the Kathmandu valley and aware people about waste segregation, had visited different schools , offices , financial institutions, Café /Restaurants, General stores, households for surveying . This time I got to know about the thoughts of individuals regarding waste segregation and its management. How they are applying 3R methods in their day to day life. In sum I had learnt how to conduct and manage programs , know about waste segregation process and its importance, build up my inner confidence to speak up my thoughts on any planning, increased my knowledge and skills regarding protection and preservation of environment, had taught the importance of teamwork and uplift my knowledge based on recycling, surveying , reporting and community awareness. Hence, 4 months could be a short period of time and it's way difficult to conclude this whole experience in a paragraph but the knowledge, skills, confidence I had developed within myself in these months was so wholesome and I felt so proud that I am a VFC member and got a chance to not only volunteering but also planning ,executing plans and participating at the programs for the betterment of near future concerning with the environmental protection.

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Burning environmental issues: plastic pollution and climate change

By Sushanta Lamichhane
Jun 23, 2023

The development of plastics started a century ago after the Second World War. Plastics are a group of polymers that have the ability to be molded in desired shapes and sizes. The stable, durable, and hydrophobic nature of plastic makes it the most desirable material. They have a wide range of applications ranging from beverage packaging to life-saving medical equipment. However, these same characteristics along with its increasing consumption resulted in increasing concern about plastic material accumulation in the environment. Pollution and climate change are burning environmental issues. Climate change is the long-term shift in temperature and weather patterns extending more than 30 years. Various factors contribute to climate change which can be natural as well as human induced. The present climate change is driven mainly by rapid urbanization, resource overexploitation, haphazard consumption, and unsustainable development. One of the prime factors that contribute to climate change is plastic pollution and plastic use as a whole. Plastic pollution is not only the driver of climate change but also the response. The study conducted by Zapata (2021) on the relationship between climate conditions and household plastic bottled water consumption found that an increase in temperature by 1ºC is associated with an increase in one-fifth of plastic bottles. The global distribution and flux of plastic pollution will also be influenced by the changing climate. Extreme weather events as a result of climate change increase the input of microplastics to the ocean (Ford et al., 2022) and can disperse microplastics between terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) are generated from extraction of plastics to their end-of-life. The production of plastic is increasing worldwide with an annual growth rate of 8.4% (Zheng & Suh, 2019). Globally, only 6% of plastics are recycled, and emission from the primary production of plastic is equivalent to over 3% of total GHGs emitted from fossil fuels (Paul et al., 2023). Incineration, which is one of the major means of plastic disposal, also results in the emission of GHGs and other harmful compounds. This highlights the significant impact of plastic generated GHGs on global climate change. Increasing post-consumer plastics generation further contributes to global warming and climate change. Single-use plastic accounts for 40% of the total plastic production. They have a lifespan ranging from a few minutes to hours before they are dumped as waste. But their resistance to microorganisms and enzymes takes thousands of years for their decomposition. Around 4.8 to 12.7 million tons of plastics entered the ocean in 2010 which will enter the food chain and consequently affect human health (Ford et al., 2022). Marginalized and poor are more affected by the combined impact of plastic pollution and climate change. Frequent and intense rainfall events which occur as a result of climate change coupled with plastic pollution blocking drainage leads to flood risk. These flood risks due to plastic pollution and climate change are evident in the 1988 flood of Bangladesh and the 2005 flood of Mumbai. With such a high impact of plastic pollution in the environment, impulsive reaction to plastic ban will have a high social and economic impact. This blanket ban on plastic affects the overall economy and has a negative impact on the livelihood of as many as 50 million people in India let alone the world (Paul et al., 2023). To tackle this, plastic recycling can be one of the means for reducing plastic pollution in the environment. However, recycling is an energy-intensive process and requires a large amount of energy. Under total use of renewable energy, recycling of plastic reduces about 77% of the GHG emission compared to that of virgin plastics (Zheng & Suh, 2019) but the use of only renewable energy cannot be guaranteed. So sensitization, advocacy, policy regulations, changing consumption patterns, and technological innovations can be adopted to mitigate plastic pollution which will enhance the mitigation of accelerated climate change. References: Ford, H. V., Jones, N. H., Davies, A. J., Godley, B. J., Jambeck, J. R., Napper, I. E., Suckling, C. C., Williams, G. J., Woodall, L. C., & Koldewey, H. J. (2022). The fundamental links between climate change and marine plastic pollution. Science of The Total Environment, 806, 150392. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.150392 Paul, S. S., Anirud, R., Bahl, B., Maheshwari, K., & Banerjee, A. (2023). Impact of plastics in the socio-economic disaster of pollution and climate change: The roadblocks of sustainability in India. In Visualization Techniques for Climate Change with Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence (pp. 77–100). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-323-99714-0.00001-7 Zapata, O. (2021). The relationship between climate conditions and consumption of bottled water: A potential link between climate change and plastic pollution. Ecological Economics, 187, 107090. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2021.107090 Zheng, J., & Suh, S. (2019). Strategies to reduce the global carbon footprint of plastics. Nature Climate Change, 9(5), 374–378. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-019-0459-z

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Health and Environment: Two sides of the coin.

By Shilpa Banjade
May 26, 2023

Environmental health is inextricably linked to public health. The well-being of people and planet are closely connected with one significantly impacting the other. According to the World Health Organization, it is estimated that environmental factors are responsible for 24% of the global burden of disease in terms of healthy life years lost and 23% of all deaths, with children being the worst sufferers. This can be viewed as nearly one-fourth of the global burden of disease can be prevented by creating healthier environment. On top of that Children under five years are more prone to the illness due to contaminated environment and surrounding because of their less well-developed immune system. For instance, indoor and outdoor air pollution, lack of access to clean water, inadequate sanitation, chemical toxic hazards, disease agents & vectors, poor waste management practices and degraded ecosystems all are notable environmental risk factors responsible for pneumonia, acute respiratory infection (ARI), dermal infection, diarrhea, cholera, malaria and other various vector borne diseases affecting Childrens including their mothers in the majority of cases. Moreover, the importance of human health and a healthy environment is a prerequisite for sustainable development as well. By integrating public health, safe environment and sustainable development goals, we can build up a roadmap that ensures a healthy population, a pristine environment and a prosperous future. From quality air to green spaces, clean drinking water to hygiene & sanitation, reducing use to plastics to eco-friendly products, proper waste management to embracing sustainable alternatives and preserving biodiversity to food security, all these efforts will certainly pave to protect our life and improve our settlements. Through the prism of public health, I came to understand that the environment is not merely a backdrop but an active participant in determining the health and happiness of our communities. So, we are the guardians of our planet, have the power to hold the key for unlocking a future where our health and the environment are embraced in a timeless embrace of resilience and balance. Consequently, I believe in the symphony of life that public health and the environment can dance harmoniously in their rhythms intertwined to create a melody of well-being.

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Unsung Heros : The waste Workers of Nepal

By Pragya Neupane
Apr 28, 2023

For my final year thesis work, my friend and I decided to work on solid waste management techniques, which gave me the opportunity to observe and work with the waste workers who have been working for years in this field. We collected waste from Lalitpur Metropolitan City’s transfer station in Balkumari and had to segregate the waste into organic and inorganic waste. In the scorching sun, wearing two pairs of gloves, masks, and plastic covering our feet, we started separating the huge pile of waste, and within an hour we realized that it was very naive of us to have thought that we could separate 1000 kg of waste ourselves. We felt horrible; it was unhygienic, and it felt like an impossible task. Within 2-3 hours of working to separate the waste, our bodies gave up, so the next day we decided to call two waste workers to help us with the task. Two young guys, probably in their early 20s, just like us, came in with their cycles. We were there wearing raincoats, gloves, and masks covering every part of our bodies, and on the other hand, there they were in their everyday clothes, barefoot, and uncovered, separating the waste. It was us who provided them with masks and gloves, because it seemed strange to us that they were ready to just do it without any precautions. They were also quite amused that students like us were ready to separate waste along with them and laughed at us for wearing all those raincoats and covering ourselves fully so that waste could not touch any part of our bodies. I started a conversation with them and asked them how they got into this sector and how long they had been doing it. These two men came from the borders of Nepal and had been working in the field of waste for more than 10 years. When I asked if they found it important to protect themselves with gloves, they said it was already a habit; they did wear the self-protection kits during COVID, but now it's just back to normal. From this conversation, I developed so much respect for these men and for all those waste workers who work unprotected every day to maintain a waste-free community for us while risking their own health. This is not just the story of these two young men; it’s the story of thousands of people working in this field, risking their health, and not getting enough respect from society. According to the World Bank, the waste management sector in Nepal employs approximately 35,000 people, including waste pickers, waste transporters, and staff at waste treatment and disposal facilities. The issues faced by solid waste workers in Nepal are numerous, including low pay, inadequate safety gear, and restricted access to healthcare. They are exposed to a variety of health concerns, including as respiratory illnesses, skin infections, and other issues since they operate in dangerous and unhygienic environments. It is very important to take a step towards making their lives easier , respectful and healthier since if not for them we don’t know what the situation of waste in our communities would be like .

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Plastic Pollution in Kathmandu: A Looming Threat to Nepal's Environment

By Neeti Pradhan
Apr 14, 2023

Nepal is a landlocked country in South Asia, known for its natural beauty, cultural diversity, and mountaineering tourism. However, the country is facing a growing environmental threat in the form of plastic pollution, which is increasingly becoming a major problem in its capital city, Kathmandu. Despite Nepal's efforts to reduce plastic waste, the country continues to struggle with plastic pollution. The lack of proper waste management infrastructure and awareness among the public has resulted in significant environmental and health problems. This blog explores the issue of plastic pollution in Kathmandu and its impact on Nepal's environment. What is Plastic Pollution? Plastic pollution is the accumulation of plastic waste in the environment, which can cause harm to wildlife, ecosystems, and human health. Plastics are synthetic materials that are non-biodegradable and can persist in the environment for hundreds of years. They can break down into smaller particles known as microplastics, which can enter the food chain and have harmful effects on wildlife and humans. The Issue of Plastic Pollution in Kathmandu Kathmandu, Nepal's capital city, is home to over 3 million people and is one of the fastest-growing urban centers in South Asia. The city is experiencing a rapid increase in plastic consumption, with an estimated 5,000 tons of plastic waste generated every day. The lack of proper waste management infrastructure is a major contributor to plastic pollution in Kathmandu. Many households and businesses in the city do not have access to proper waste disposal infrastructure, such as garbage bins or recycling facilities, which has resulted in large amounts of plastic waste being dumped in public spaces, rivers, and landfills. Furthermore, there is a lack of awareness among the public about the negative impacts of plastic waste on the environment and human health. Many people still view plastic as a convenient and disposable material, without realizing the long-term consequences of its improper disposal. Impact of Plastic Pollution on Nepal's Environment Plastic pollution has a significant impact on Nepal's environment, which is known for its natural beauty and biodiversity. Plastic waste can have a harmful effect on wildlife, ecosystems, and water resources. Wildlife: Plastic pollution can harm wildlife through ingestion or entanglement. Marine animals, in particular, are at risk, as they mistake plastic waste for food, which can lead to intestinal blockages and starvation. Ecosystems: Plastic pollution can also disrupt ecosystems by altering nutrient cycles, soil structure, and water availability. Microplastics can also enter the food chain and have harmful effects on soil organisms and plants. Water resources: Plastic pollution can contaminate water resources, which are vital for agriculture and human consumption. Plastic waste can clog waterways and reduce water quality, which can have a negative impact on human health. What can be done to Address Plastic Pollution in Kathmandu? Efforts are being made by various organizations and government bodies to address the issue of plastic pollution in Kathmandu. These include campaigns to raise awareness about the impacts of plastic waste, initiatives to promote recycling and proper waste disposal, and the introduction of policies and regulations to reduce the production and use of single-use plastics. Individuals can also play a crucial role in reducing plastic pollution by adopting sustainable practices, such as reducing plastic consumption, recycling, and properly disposing of plastic waste. Therefore, Plastic pollution is a growing threat to Nepal's environment, particularly in its capital city, Kathmandu. The lack of proper waste management infrastructure and awareness among the public have resulted in significant environmental and health problems. Addressing plastic pollution will require the collective efforts of individuals, businesses, and the government to make significant progress towards a more sustainable and healthy future. It is essential to take immediate action to prevent Plastic Pollution.

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Plastic Credits – A promising way to tackle the global plastic crisis?

By Alexandra Engel
Mar 24, 2023

Whether in the deep sea, tropical regions, or the North and Baltic Seas, plastic waste can be found on every coast and in every ocean of the world. Even in the Mariana Trench, the deepest point in the world's oceans at 11,000 meters and close to the summit of Mount Everest at 8,440 metres high, microplastics has been found. Since its commercial development in the 1930s and 1940s, plastic has become increasingly dominant in the consumer market. The amount produced has increased exponentially for decades, further compounded by the Covid-19 pandemic. Therefore, nowadays, every living species throughout every ecosystem on the planet is detrimentally affected by plastic pollution. The problem of plastic waste leaking into the environment is particularly severe in countries where no adequate and sufficient waste management system is in place. In order to address the issue, more and more efforts and strategies to combat the plastic crisis developed in recent years, including plastic credits. A plastic credit is a transferable unit representing a specific quantity of plastic that has been collected and possibly recycled from the environment. Usually, the system is based on a one-for-one basis, meaning one plastic credit represents one tonne of collected and/or recycled plastic waste. For example, if a company has a plastic footprint (the amount of plastic waste it generates) of 200 tonnes, it must purchase 200 plastic credits to offset all its plastic consumption. The money spent on plastic credits is allocated to a project that collects and/or recycles plastic waste in exchange for receiving this funding. As a result, the plastic credit system creates benefits for both parties. The company that bought the credit can claim that they assume responsibility for the plastic they release into the environment and that they make a significant contribution towards reducing plastic pollution. Correspondingly, the project generating the credit secures funding for the collection and recycling of plastic in a sustainable manner, which would not have been possible otherwise. The funding through the credits intends to support organizations that not only fight against plastic pollution to preserve the environment but also focus on social aspects by supporting local communities, improving the livelihood of waste pickers, and increasing job opportunities. Ideally, the award of credits would lead to investments and improvements in local waste management infrastructure and strengthen the ability of waste management systems to keep plastic in the system rather than in nature. However, the weaknesses and risks of the system must also be considered. As more and more organizations offer plastic credits, the risks and weaknesses of the system are becoming more apparent and evident. Critics say that plastic credits are only meant to address the symptoms of the plastic crisis (collecting the waste that has already entered the environment) rather than the roots of the problem, which is the continuous manufacture and consumption of single-use plastic. As a result, the plastic credit system includes a contradiction: businesses might continue to generate more plastic while also benefiting from the green image related to credit schemes. Companies might claim to be "plastic neutral" by simply acquiring plastic credits while resuming to pollute from their supply chain and conducting business as usual. Consequently, the system could be used for greenwashing. Responsible companies require comprehensive solutions to address their plastic footprint, which is impossible without changing their operations or products. Humankind needs immense biodiversity to survive. The synergy of every tiny mechanism and species in the oceans and the natural environment ensures that the Earth is habitable. However, due to human activity, the planet's biodiversity is in decline. Science has shown and proven this more and more clearly in recent years. Therefore, it is time to make a decision. We could consciously ignore the imminent disaster. Or we could change our behavior. Plastic credits can support this transition by financing the collection of plastic waste, which already pollutes the environment, but in the end, the best waste is the one not generated. Every piece of plastic that is avoided is a success and contributes to protecting the oceans and nature from further pollution.

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Gender and Climate Change?

By Neeti Pradhan
Mar 17, 2023

We’ve all heard about Climate Change and its ongoing effects all around the world. Climate Change is increasingly being recognized as a global crisis. It has caused crisis in different areas of life, but have we ever wondered what relation does Climate Change have with Gender? The responses to climate change has mostly been focused more on the economic and scientific solutions, however human and gender dimensions has still been overlooked even though it plays a significant role in understanding and mitigating climate change. Climate change, to put it simply, is the term used to describe the increasingly unpredictable weather, rising sea levels, and extreme events that may be linked to human activities and greenhouse gas emissions. Climate change is frequently perceived as a scientific and technological issue, but it also has significant social, economic, and political ramifications for gender equality and social justice. Extreme occurrences like floods, heat waves, and natural disasters are becoming more frequent as a result of the acceleration of climate change. Due to this, those in the global south who have made the least contributions to the issue suffer the most in terms of their livelihood. Even among men and women, they do not experience climate change equally. Due to cultural norms and economic restrictions, women are still not allowed to work in paid jobs in many developing nations. As a result, their primary source of income is subsistence agriculture or collecting water. Since women perform the majority of the household's unpaid activities due to economic restrictions and gender inequity, the effects of climate change have a direct impact on their life It increases their already added household responsibilities such as walking further for increasing scarce of food and water, taking care of family members due to health problems linked to climate change and so on. With added responsibilities women and girls have little time for their own development such as education, income generating activities, participation in community decision making processes which further increases unequal gender relations. However, having said that, men also experience negative impacts of climate change, especially when they belong to economically poor backgrounds. When men are considered as the breadwinners in a society, when their rural livelihoods are undermined by the impacts of climate change, it can cause stress to them as they cannot fulfill the societal expectations as “providers”. Therefore, adding gender dimensions to policies are extremely important. Many climate change policies are still largely gender blind, overlooking the gender dimensions of climate change. Even where gender issues are considered, they are seen as an “add-on” to existing policies. Climate change policies and processes will be neither effective nor fair unless they become more gender aware. Therefore, it is important for climate-adaptation policies to not only treat women as vulnerable beneficiaries but also as rights-holding citizens who need to be recognized for the agency, skills and experience they can contribute.

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Why Poverty Alleviation in Asian Countries is Imperative to Combat Climate Change

By Ritesh Raj Gurung
Mar 10, 2023

Climate Change has been a hot issue for a good decade and different indicators show quite a bleak outlook for the future of our planet. We all know that we need to combat Climate Change but are we applying ourselves the correct method? Separating the politics from the statistics, the trajectory of Climate Change in the proceeding years will be decided by the population ranging from “under poverty” to “low-income threshold” in Asian countries. According to the Global Carbon Atlas, of the top 5 countries that rank as largest carbon emitters, 3 of them are Asian countries – China, India, and Japan moving down the list, the top 50 would predominantly be tagged by countries in Asia. Now, why is this important? Because these countries possess a massive percentage of population that is striving for simple basic livelihood and social mobility. This essential journey does not allow stakeholders to have space for climate sensibilities. Let us put ourselves in their shoes for a second; what is important for a poor breadwinner with a family? Securing the possibility of their next meal or paying attention to reducing carbon dioxide emissions? According to the book by Dr. Bjørn Lomborg, “How to Spend $75 Billion to Make the World a Better Place”, the content was composed in collaboration with top economists and Nobel Laureates that ranked global development goals later averaged into a final list. In that said list, addressing global warming and climate change was not even mentioned, but what was mentioned was increasing child nutrition in developing countries stimulating these children to lead more healthier and productive lives when they transition to adulthood creating poverty alleviation and high return on investment in a situation where these productive adults would increase the cumulative brainpower of humanity. On the other side of the argument, where the vast majority speak about alternatives and less consumption, one variable they failed to address is the massive detriment to marginalized communities across the world. WHY? For the simple reason that alternatives are expensive and it's a no-brainer that these stakeholders are already on the less consumption spectrum. Contemplating an example, if the United States, one of the major countries in carbon emissions and greenhouse gases would hypothetically go Carbon Neutral tomorrow, it would not stop or even make a dent in the “climate crisis” we are facing today. However, is the world doomed? In the book “Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World”, Dr. Hans Rosling explains that through statistical measures we can deduce that the world is becoming better to live in, therefore, there is hope. As per that stats, in the last 20 years, the proportion of the world population living in extreme poverty has almost halved, 60% percent of girls in low-income countries finish primary school and greatly climb into secondary education, global life expectancy has increased to 72.48 years, diseases are easier to combat and treat, technological innovation is escalating upwards, there decline in disaster-related deaths, war-related deaths and predominantly there more “safe” countries than those affected by civil discord. The only issue that was concerning was climate change, assuming that nothing is done about will start affecting humanity at an apocalyptic level at the end of the century because climate change projection models are not quite accurate. Therefore, we have time. Now in this length of time that we have, we should cater toward poverty alleviation efforts and social mobility strides to uplift the massive chunk of the population in Asian countries where they have the space to cultivate a thought about climate change where the battle would no longer be upward.

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My journey towards zero Plastic Waste

By Sushila Shrestha
Feb 24, 2023

Holding a master's degree in Marine Plastic, I have always been passionate about fortifying the environment, but it wasn't until I became acutely aware of the impact of plastic waste on our planet while in university that I decided to take personal responsibility and make changes in my daily life to reduce my plastic waste production. This triggered the thought of “If I won’t do it, then who will?” Initially, I felt overwhelmed and unsure of where to start, but things fell into place gingerly. It was not an easy task, but it involved plenty of blog articles, Reddit experiences, and research for alternatives. My notion was to commence my journey with small steps. I began by using a reusable water bottle instead of buying disposable plastic ones. It did make my bag heavy, but my amour propre lighter. It was a simple change, but it had a big impact on my plastic waste production. I also switched to a bamboo toothbrush and refillable soap dispensers instead of buying single-use plastic bottles. This gave me an opportunity to explore types of reusable bottles, and my favorite is made out of copper. As I continued on my journey, I looked for new ways to reduce plastic waste in my life. I started purchasing products in bulk to reduce plastic packaging waste and switched to eco-friendly cleaning products. Furthermore, I carried my own carry bag to avoid the use of plastic bags, which was pretty cost-efficient if you give it a thought. Throughout this journey, I learned that even small actions can make a big difference. When I see the amount of waste I generated this month, it all fit into a mason jar, only some crushed papers and a few wrappers. Reducing plastic waste is an ongoing journey, but it's one that's worth taking. We can all make a difference by taking small steps towards reducing our plastic waste consumption. Whether it's using a reusable water bottle or using bamboo brushes, every action counts.

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My Journey as a Creative Intern at CREASION: A story of Growth and Friendship

By Pragyan Swarnkar
Feb 17, 2023

Susurrations echoed in my ears as if I was laying on gray sand, on the shore. It didn’t take me long to realize I wasn’t in Goa but in Kathmandu, confined to four walls, on an enormous bed that inevitably made the room look smaller than it is. It wasn’t the ocean but my phone passing the vibes, perhaps to wake me up for something that could change my life forever, the first day of my first on-site job. I was ecstatic, my heart pounded, and a wave of thoughts turned my sand of aspirations into quicksand. Doubts started to pop up, what if I wouldn’t be able to make the most out of it? Or perhaps don’t get the kind of work I am competent for. Nevertheless, there’s nothing a warm and steamy shower can’t solve. I got in the car, and my father, the core reason for me taking up the employment opportunity insisted to drop me off at work. He made an offer I couldn’t refuse; there’s a reason why my friends call me DC — Directionally Challenged. I set my foot into the bungalow, I didn’t know which entrance to use, one led to a few room and the other to the staircase. I had visited the place before but it felt more like a mirage of rooms and staircases. Gingerly, I got used to it. Looking back in my time as a creative intern at CREASION, I can't help but feel a sense of pride and nostalgia. It was a journey of self-discovery, personal growth and invaluable connections. However, from the very first day, I was welcomed with open arms by my colleagues and mentors. They were always available to offer guidance and support, and I felt like I was part of a family. As I settled into my role, I was given the opportunity to work on a variety of projects, including designing social media posts, writing blogs, editing videos and formulating captions. I also had the chance to design presentations, standees and banners. These projects allowed me to showcase my creativity and push the boundaries of my skills. One of the most challenging and rewarding aspects of my role was creating content that resonated with our audience. I learned the importance of considering their preferences and researching their needs, and I was able to use that knowledge to create content that was both visually appealing and meaningful. But the most significant takeaway from my experience was the friendships I made. The team was more than just colleagues, they were friends who supported me through my ups and downs. I will always cherish the memories and bonds I formed during my time there. As I move forward in my career, I will always look back on my experience with fondness. It was a turning point in my life, and I will always be grateful for the opportunities, growth, and friendships that I gained during my time there. CREASION is not just an organization but a family that helps each other to grow together. I have a memory of my first day wrapped in gold foils, Mr. Aanand Mishra had called me to his room, made me sit and said, “Don’t ever look at me as a grumpy boss but a supportive leader, you have any issues with anything, I’m there to help you out.” In conclusion, my journey as a creative intern was an emotional and transformative experience. I am proud of the work I accomplished and the relationships I formed, and I will always cherish the memories I made during my time there.

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Circular Economy

By Pratik Bajracharya and Yunish Ghimire
Feb 10, 2023

At the COP26, Nepal’s Prime Minister, Sher Bahadur Deuba made a commitment to achieve Net Zero Carbon Emission in Nepal by 2045. To achieve this ambitious goal set by the PM, Nepal needs to shift away from the current linear ‘take-make-dispose' model towards a circular model of economy. In simple terms, Circular Economy (CE) is a model that is aimed at the efficient use of available resources by minimizing waste production long-term value retention of waste through re-integrating waste into product value chain. According to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation1, the CE model is guided by three major principles: eliminate waste and pollution, circulate products and materials, and regenerate nature. CE is directly linked with re-integrating the waste into the product value chain which ultimately reduces carbon emissions. Hence, to realize the commitments of attaining Zero Carbon Emission by 2045, it is important for Nepal to incorporate CE in governmental plans and policies. Over the last few years, the notion of CE has started to gain traction in developing countries like Nepal. For a rapidly urbanizing economy like Nepal, infrastructure development requires an extensive use of raw materials. So, there is a huge need to implement CE model in Nepal to promote sustainable infrastructure development. Furthermore, CE puts emphasis on using local resources, uplifting indigenous knowledge and skills, and prioritizing sustainable development of infrastructure. These facets of CE play an important role in promoting climate resilient and climate adaptive communities. According to research, limited institutional capacity and a lack of access to finance and technology are the two major barriers to implementing CE in developing countries like Nepal. Furthermore, the understanding of CE is limited to recycling and waste management, which undermines its principle of eliminating waste at the source. Thus, the first step of integrating CE is to enhance the individual and organizational understanding of CE. As a result of these major challenges, CE has yet to be incorporated in Nepal’s governmental policies and guidelines; for example, the 15th five-year plan has completely ignored it. Similarly, the SDG action plan developed by Nepal Planning Commission (NPC) has emphasized the need of recycling, but it doesn’t prioritize waste reduction. Moving towards a CE model will require close collaboration with all the key stakeholders. The role of civil societies including NGOs and INGOs will be specifically important in acting as a liaison between the private sector and government bodies. Furthermore, their role will also be significant in attracting foreign donors, investments, skills and knowledge. There are several institutions in Nepal working towards CE through recycling, upcycling and innovation – CREASION, Doko Recyclers, Blue Waste to Value. CREASION is one such organization that has contributed to the CE of plastic waste by enhancing the supply chain by focusing on facilitating the aggregators with infrastructures and technologies. We can create a road towards circularity and assist in the elimination of plastic waste by working together with individuals, governments, communities, and businesses. The cost of disposing waste to Banchare landfill on average is NPR 2/kg, whereas, when looked at from a market perspective, dumped plastic waste is highly valuable. In addition to economic incentive, shifting to a CE model will support the local bodies in waste management and creating a sustainable environment. Hence, incorporating CE in Nepal’s plans and policies will be integral to meet the SDG 2030 and Nepal's commitment of Net Zero Carbon Emission by 2045. Furthermore, it is the ideal sustainability strategy for businesses as it maximizes resource utilization, reduces pollution, and benefits the country at large. Thus, in the longer run, CE will be beneficial to individuals, communities, governments, private sectors, and more importantly to the environment.

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Five Simple Ways to Protect the Environment Every Day

By Binita Niraula
Feb 03, 2023

As the impacts of climate change become more and more evident, all of us need to do our part to protect the environment. But sometimes it can feel overwhelming to know where to start. That's why, here are 5 simple ways how we can make a difference every day. Reduce energy consumption: One of the easiest ways to reduce our impact on the environment is to use less energy. We can do this by turning off lights and appliances when we're not using them, using energy-efficient bulbs and appliances, and unplugging chargers when they're not in use. Use eco-friendly products: Another way to reduce our environmental impact is to choose products that are eco-friendly. This can include everything from using reusable shopping bags to choosing cleaning products that are biodegradable. Support conservation efforts: There are many organizations working to protect the environment, and supporting them is a great way to make a difference. This can include donating money to conservation organizations, volunteering our time, or simply spreading the word about the work they do. Eat sustainably: Our food choices can have a big impact on the environment. By choosing to eat sustainably, we can reduce our carbon footprint and support environmentally friendly farming practices. This can include eating locally-grown and organic food, reducing our consumption of meat, and supporting companies that use sustainable practices. Advocate for change: One of the most powerful things we can do to protect the environment is to advocate for change. This can include supporting politicians who prioritize the environment, signing petitions, and speaking out about environmental issues.   By taking small steps every day, we can all make a difference in protecting the environment. Whether it's reducing energy consumption, using eco-friendly products, supporting conservation efforts, eating sustainably, or advocating for change, there are many simple ways we can take action. Let's do our part to protect the planet for future generations.  

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Social Entrepreneurship as an approach to community development

By Raashi Shrestha
Jan 27, 2023

Social entrepreneurship is an approach by individuals, groups, start-up companies or entrepreneurs, in which they develop funds and implement solutions to social, cultural or environmental issues. It mainly focuses on “value creation” rather than “value proposition”. The term “entrepreneurship” is popular nowadays as it helps to uplift the economy and encourage new innovation. Similarly, the concept “social entrepreneurship” is also being highlighted nowadays. However, the concept is different than commercial entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurs seek to solve and address the social, environmental and cultural problems to create an impact in the society. In order to uplift a certain community, it is important to find the root cause of the society which directly or indirectly affects the community, environment, economy and so on. After the pandemic, the world has been facing crisis in terms of economy, environment, etc. Therefore, as declared by World Economic Forum, the concept of social entrepreneurship is growing because it can help to work towards bringing solutions to social problems and also uplift the community in various ways. Similarly, it also adds value to the concept of sustainable development. Additionally, the literacy rate in Nepal is 67. 9% (2018 A. D) and unemployment rate is 1. 28% (2018 A.D) which are the two main factors for community development. After the covid outbreak, the unemployment rate has increased as many people lost their jobs especially people who have been working in the informal sectors. Therefore, social entrepreneurs find this as a great opportunity to create job opportunities by their business model with social inclusion addressing various issues in the community. Moreover, many donor-based agencies are transforming their organizations into social enterprise model so that such organizations can minimize relying financially from the donors and can sustain themselves, which is a great practice. Nepal, being a developing country has a lot of potentials when it comes to creating jobs and we need to focus on gaps to be fulfilled for the development of individuals and the country. Therefore, social enterprises can be the changemakers and drivers of community development as it considers all the factors of inclusive practice that create a better space for all to live in.

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The fixing of Ozone hole: Let’s learn from history

By Pratik Bajracharya
Jan 20, 2023

The earth's atmosphere is made up of several layers, the major layers are the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere, and exosphere. Located between approximately 15 and 35 kilometers above the surface is the stratosphere containing the ozone layer, which protects us from the Sun’s harmful ultraviolet radiation that can cause skin cancer and cataracts, suppress immune systems, and also damage plants. The ozone layer reflects 98% of the harmful UV rays. The ozone layers consist of ozone (O3) which is a highly reactive molecule comprised of three oxygen atoms that occur naturally in small amounts. Ozone is one of the trace gases in the atmosphere. US chemists noted that, in 1970 the extensively used CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) in appliances (refrigerator, freezers, aerosol spray) were building up in the atmosphere and thinning the ozone layer. However, it was widely disputed whether the CFCs created at the surface would be able to harm the ozone layer up until the beginning of 1980, when field data from Antarctica revealed an ozone layer decline that rocked the world. The Southern Continent's ozone layer had decreased by more than 50% by 1987, and after 1980, the layer continued to deteriorate by 20% per year. Scientists were concerned that these increases in UV radiation could have a severe impact on ecosystems and human health as the amount of stratospheric ozone decreased. Projections suggested the ozone layer would collapse by 2050, increasing skin cancer rates, harming crops, and destroying the marine food chain. The Montreal Protocol then saved the day in 1987. All 198 UN Members States have accepted this protocol, making it the only UN treaty to date to have done so. The protocol prohibited the creation of compounds that deplete the ozone layer. Up until the year 2000, the amount of man-made ozone depleting compounds in the atmosphere rose. Despite being outlawed upon the implementation of the protocol, CFCs still persist for a very long time in the atmosphere. Chlorine and other ozone-depleting substances have been decreasing in the atmosphere ever since. Around 2070, according to scientists, chlorine levels should return to normal. By then the Antarctic ozone hole will shrink to smaller than eight million square miles. The ozone layer has shown overall signs of improvement as a result of the Montreal Protocol. The UV radiation would have increased by 20% if the Montreal Protocol hadn't been implemented. Because CFCs are also a greenhouse gas, the Montreal Protocol not only helps close the ozone hole but also lessens global warming. This demonstrates that the best way to address pressing global issues is through collaborative action that is informed by science. This kind of encouraging news ought to motivate us all to work together to limit the increase in the earth's temperature. The media is crucial in translating knowledge into practice; CFCs were mentioned in practically every publication to reach a wider audience, including newspapers, magazines, and movies. Mass knowledge of this kind puts pressure on global leaders to take prompt action. It was simple to bring about significant improvements with alternative chemicals because to government and business backing. Even while we now have a wide range of alternatives—electric cars, sustainable energy—we are still lagging behind and won't be able to keep the world's temperature below 1.5 degrees Celsius. As Dr. Shanklin says "And when the scientists send a warning, the politicians need to listen". The only way we will be able to combat global warming is to fund researches and act immediately.

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Nepal’s Indigenous and Climate-Friendly Enterprises Need Support for Sustainable Growth

By Phurpa Sherpa
Jan 13, 2023

Our forefathers experimented for generations to establish indigenous knowledge and customs, which are currently passed down from generation to generation. Indigenous knowledge is the most effective method for sustainable development. In the past, people were known to have content and healthy lives. A little town was the world to itself, the environment was healthier, and there were fewer fundamental requirements. History is close by. Nepal used to be self-sufficient in every way. Our ancestors were bold, courageous, and hardworking people who refused to let any other country's dictatorship reign over our country. All our fundamental needs were prepared for and developed by our great-grandparents. Until we relied on native and local customs and companies rather than imported goods, the nation and its citizens remained tranquil and healthy. But as soon as the goods that were imported started to dominate our local marketplaces, people started to become less interested in traditional and native ways of life. As a result, the environment started degrading at an increasing rate due to the growth of fancy and non-biodegradable products in the markets. Time is incredibly valuable. It keeps people informed of all environmental changes. The majority of people in the world have learned from their mistakes as we now move into the twenty-first century. They now understand that every negative consequence that the planet and human beings are facing today is the result of their daily activities. As a result, some people are developing environmentally friendly business concepts, and others are committing to exclusively consume environmentally friendly foods. As an innovation coordinator for the European Union-funded Project for Nepali Yuwa in Climate Action and Green Growth based at CREASION, I was given the responsibility to explore environmentally and climate-friendly firms and ideas amongst the youths of Madhesh Province and provide support in framing their businesses to generate profitable and sustainable goods. As part of my role, I got an opportunity to observe many small startup environments and climate-friendly businesses from a very close distance. I was surprised to see young people coming up with indigenous business knowledge with great passion and determination. However, the pain point of almost every aspiring entrepreneur is that they have struggled to find their ideal target market. Rekha Marik is 26 years old. For many generations, her family has produced Dhakia Konia. Rekha claims that her ancestors were wealthier when they had the same business, but that she is now having trouble supporting her family since the market value of their handcrafted goods has been degraded due to cheap plastic products in the market. Another budding entrepreneur is Sushma Shah. She has long worked as a trainer for eco-pads and now manufactures locally-made cotton pads that are excellent for both the environment and human health. She also is aware of how individuals are conscious of their health and the environment but still choose to purchase synthetic sanitary pads from the market. Most individuals recognize the environment and climate-friendly products, but only a small percentage utilize them. Environment and climate-friendly products are more than simply products, they represent the tale of genuine entrepreneurs and the hardship they endured to create the product. Some climate-friendly products are indigenous, they are made by hand with love and blessings. Some products carry symbolic significance with cultural values and norms. One such example is the Mithila art. I had heard about the Mithila Kingdom, and its kings and queens in the form of stories. I am over warmed to see the youth bringing entrepreneurial ideas to promote history in the form of art during the Climate Smart Entrepreneurship Program. If you are an antique fashion and handicraft lover then do check out their amazing Mithila art depicted product at Mithila art (Art for Climate) in the town. Everyone strives to maintain good health and is extremely selective about the food that they buy from the modern market. At the same time, they are also aware of how challenging it can be to create pesticide-free and organic agricultural products. But when it comes to buying food people would rather choose chemically contaminated products over organic and pesticide-free products to save a small amount of cash. Such customer behavior has demotivated young start-up entrepreneurs despite their passion and determination to support the green climate of the world. Climate Smart Entrepreneurship is the most required development for our generation as they are the only sustainable solution to fight back against the negative consequences of Climate Change. Very few people such as indigenous and innovative youth are coming forward to initiate Climate Smart Entrepreneurship. However, these entrepreneurs are facing various challenges in scaling up and ensuring that their businesses add to sustainable impact. Indigenous people possess knowledge of local ecosystems and which climate actions can be effective for them. Similarly, youth are initiating innovation through their years of research. A business model that promotes leadership, and knowledge that also supports the values of local communities along with a healthy environment is a key foundation to any efforts directed towards enhancing climate resilience. Therefore, it is our responsibility to support indigenous and Climate Smart Entrepreneurs for the betterment of our health, and the planet and the overall prosperity of our upcoming generations.

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My Experience as a Volunteer Member

By Aaditya Jha
Dec 25, 2022

My journey with Volunteer for Change (VFC) has been profoundly transformative, leaving an indelible mark on my personal and personality development. VFC has been more than just an organization to me; it has been a second home that consistently provides me with opportunities to contribute to meaningful events. During my time volunteering with VFC, I have had the privilege of participating in a range of impactful events like "Trash to Treasure," which allowed me to share insights with school children about repurposing waste materials and educating them about recyclable and non-recyclable waste, to initiatives like "Hamro Cycle Yatra," which aimed to honor and acknowledge Informal Waste Workers, by celebrating their contributions with medals, certificates, health checkups, and even a cycle rally, recognizing their vital contribution to waste management and providing them the appreciation they deserve but don't usually receive. Another remarkable event "Swap Your Plastics" offered a creative way to promote recycling, rewarding people with table plants for recycling plastic bottles and showcased the power of collective action in recycling. The Nepal Recollectors and Recyclers Association (NRRA) event allowed me to learn important insights on waste management, sustainability, and community appreciation. Events like the "National Colloquium" expanded my horizons and introduced me to inspiring and remarkable personalities. Engaging in events such as the "Futsal with Waste Workers" tournament provided me with some unforgettable memories and insightful sessions like "Know Your Plastics" session and the CV writing workshop broadened my understanding of plastics as well as enhanced my skills and professionalism and equipped me with practical skills. These multifaceted events, offering new learning avenues, have contributed significantly to my personal and professional development. Being part of VFC exposed me to continuous learning and skill development, fostering personal growth and enhancing my professionalism. The support, camaraderie, and enriching experiences within VFC, orchestrated by the incredible team at Creasion, have truly made this a remarkable and unforgettable chapter of my life. The sense of belonging I feel at VFC, the warmth of the people, the supportive environment, and the meaningful work are simply incredible. As a VFC member, I've been blessed to find an extraordinary community within Creasion, marked by exceptional individuals and I've always cherished the remarkable community, the nurturing atmosphere, and the unwavering support provided by Creasion. Most importantly, VFC introduced me to people who now hold a special place in my heart. Above all, the connections I've forged—the friends who have become family—stand as the true treasure. And above all, Sushila mam's mentorship, akin to an elder sister, has been an unwavering source of inspiration. The mentorship and support I’ve received from her have been pivotal. More than a mentor, she has always been an elder sister to me, pushing me to excel. Her appreciation and encouragement remains my greatest motivation that fuels my continued journey and is the driving force behind my determination to persevere.

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Children and Sustainable Development Goals Education

By Sushila Shrestha
Oct 14, 2022

In my role as a Program Associate for Recycler Saathi, I often get the opportunity to engage with students in one of our programs ‘Waste Smart School’. Waste Smart School is a one-of-a-kind model that provides students and young children with an environment-friendly and environment-conscious outlook. Students receive exposure and all-around knowledge about the waste management scenario for environmental protection. During the waste smart school programs, I noticed that a learning model like such really helps students to pique their interest in these issues. This got me thinking that we should educate our children more about Sustainable Development Goals. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were set forth by the United Nations in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 integrated Goals are designed as a blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. And in this universal call to action, no stakeholders should be left behind, not even children. Incorporating SDG goals in early childhood education can help children to develop insights, connect the dots and understand how everything everywhere is interconnected. The SDG issues are very much part of our social fabric and a better understanding of these issues helps a child to be more aware and be involved in active problem solving as SDGs are fully actionable goals. Early SDG education can help young minds to foster values that support Sustainable Development Goals which can include wise use of resources, cultural diversity, gender equality, sustainable consumption and many more. Early awareness will help these children grow up to be conscientious and bring about measurable, favorable and gradual changes to achieve the SDGs by 2030. In today’s globally connected world, there are a lot of ways to engage the children which can include early discussion, observation, curriculum incorporation and awareness. Learning models that gravitate these young minds to think of innovative approaches and plan management ideas should be encouraged. It will guide the children to act towards sustainable development of their community through their own personal and collective efforts. Some really interesting resources and programs I have come across, specifically designed for children and SDG education are as follows: The World’s Largest Lesson The World’s Largest Lesson reaches millions of children, primarily through schools. Co-founded by UNICEF and Project Everyone, the initiative offers a set of free and translated lessons, animations and activities for every classroom. Comics Uniting Nations Comics Uniting Nations works with world-renowned comic book artists and storytellers to bring the SDGs to life. Co-founded by UNICEF, PCI Media Impact, and Reading with Pictures, the library of comics has reached 20 books and counting. SDG Activate Talk Series Youth Activate Talks bring young change-makers to the stage to showcase for decision makers the ways they are supporting the goals, and to inspire others to take action. Through moderated discussions using activism, the arts, invention and innovation, young speakers welcome their peers and leaders to join them in support of the SDGs. Trash Invasion A fun game for Recycling Trash Invasion is a game designed for children to develop their waste management and recycling skills. A child can destroy trash items, capture monsters, defeat final bosses, collect coins, get gifts, and bonuses to unlock unique levels. The game has over 1K+ downloads and a 4.5-star rating in Playstore. It has made learning about recycling more fun. It is important for children to know that their personal and collective efforts can help the world to confront the climate challenges and build a more sustainable world for all of us. It is important to let them know that they are the heroic leaders for the change. Nepal also needs to put forward significant initiatives that incorporate early SDG education in every child’s life.

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My Interaction with Waste Workers

By Thinley Doma Ghale
Sep 26, 2022

Being a student of the social sciences, I have always loved to work in the development sector. One day as I was walking out my house, I saw a pile of garbage dumped outside. I had always seen waste workers come and pick up the garbage that lay outside my house. People usually were very rude to them and considered them dirty. But I always remembered what my father said- that they are the real heroes of the country, and we should salute them instead of looking down upon them. At first, the words that my father said astonished me and hit me hard, but I soon learned how despite being perceived in a bad light, the waste workers were the ones who really contribute to keeping the environment clean. A few months back, I got the opportunity to interact with one of the waste workers at a scrap centers. The interaction was overwhelming as well as heartbreaking. Most of the workers were pretty open in talking about their lives and how they had started working in this industry while some of them were a bit hesitant to talk. From this interaction, I gathered that most of the workers had a hard life back in their village and moved to the capital of the city with the aspiration of finding a good job to feed their children. One of the interactions was with an old couple where both the husband and the wife worked in the waste industry, driving on earning daily wages by baling plastic bottles while keeping a roof over their head to feed seven children. Even though they struggles to make ends meet they wished for their children to have a better future and urge them to pay attention to their education. They were pleased with how well behaved and appreciative her kids were of their efforts. Our waste workers keep our homes and environment clean. They work in the landfills and sort out the waste that we collectively produce. They certainly are our environmental heroes, but there is still more to be done for our waste workers and the waste management industry as a whole.

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Monsoon and Disaster Preparedness in Nepal

By Yunish Ghimire
Aug 26, 2022

Every year disasters pertaining to monsoon rain have been a recurring theme in Nepal. Monsoon in Nepal usually lasts from June to September. However, post monsoon rain that started in October last year ran ravage throughout the country. The human causalities from rain and landslides reached more than 100. Furthermore, the rainfall also destroyed the paddy crops in several parts of the country. According to the estimates of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, the damage to the paddy crops stood at around NRS 8.26 billion. A total of 85,580 hectares of ready-to-harvest land were swept away or submerged by floodwaters which destroyed around 325, 258 tons of paddy. The loss is estimated at around 0.6% of the total GDP. According to the Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, Nepal is expected to receive above average rainfall this year too. Similarly, a report by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Authority highlights that around 2 million people or 421,047 households will be impacted by the monsoon rain and landslides. The government has alerted security personnel including Armed Police Force (APF) and Nepal Army (NA) to be prepared for rescue operations. However, the major issue of the government lies on the short-term preparedness rather than prioritizing the long-term disaster management efforts. One of the major shortcomings is seen in the area of Early Warning Systems (EWS). For instance, the department of Water and Meteorology had forecasted the post monsoon rainfall. However, the information failed to reach the concerned stakeholders. Thus, the damages incurred by the farmers can solely be attributed towards the lack of dissemination of information at the local levels. Different studies have indicated that strengthening EWS can save anywhere from 25% to 60% in property damages. Time and again, the government has outlined that it would focus on early warning systems. However, the details on how it would strengthen the systems are still unclear. Furthermore, Nepal lacks advanced technology of early warning systems and there is also a weak coordination between different disaster related agencies and non-governmental organizations working in disaster preparedness work. The Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) Act was passed in 2017 to oversee the management of all kinds of disasters. However, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council still doesn’t exist. Similarly, it is evident that the preparations for pre-disaster are minimal and most of its focus is oriented towards post disaster response. The government has focused on token relief measures, which shifts the focus away from long term disaster management. Despite this, the use of government aid for the affected communities hasn’t been effective. According to a survey funded by the UN, only 39 percent of the flood victims believe that the government fund is reaching the affected communities. In case of crops damage, farmers are required to show proof of land ownership to claim government aid. Under this policy, the tenant farmers are barred from receiving aid. Hence, even with the government’s focus on relief measures, adequate relief measures have continuously failed to reach the victims. Nepal is prone to natural disasters such as floods, landslides, and wildfires, while climate change has made the extreme weather conditions more frequent and unpredictable. The data has indicated that the intensity of rainfall has increased over the past few years, which further increases the risks associated with flooding and inundation in terai and landslides in hilly region. Thus, moving forward it is important that the government directs its attention towards adaptive policies to make vulnerable communities more resilient towards the impact of monsoon rain and landslides. This should be a bottom-up approach, meaning that the local communities should be involved in the planning process which will help address their needs.

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My Experience at International Youth Day 2022

By Pragyan Swarnkar
Aug 19, 2022

“Ping” my phone vibrated, having no idea of me being mostly unbothered by any notifications other than a few applications but Calendar. Never in my life have I taken calendar notifications seriously, except that one time when I almost missed the concert, I had been saving money to buy a VVIP ticket and have a getaway from school to the city of Jaipur during Holi. I sat in my car and rode to my workplace, with a bag filled with unwanted sheets of papers and a ball pen which I detested, along with a diary clenched in the corner, besides my laptop charger, amnesic of the fact that I had gotten any sort of notification regarding something I cared the least about. But little did I know that this time, it wasn’t a reminder for an event I had put on, but something that comes every year, unnoticed by my encephalon; “International Youth Day”. Getting to work on time is the best feeling but reaching the workstation right before a minute to the end of your entrance buffer is superior. I felt it. The moment I put my bag on the floor with a sigh, Sushila, my colleague, stuttered “We have International Youth Day coming up this week, think of something”, it took me a couple of minutes to register the command, which deliberately took me back when my phone had pinged to give me the same information which I was highly ignorant of. I swiped through a couple of websites, and figured out IYD to be an event just a few years older to me. The United Nations had decided on a theme “Intergenerational Solidarity: Creating a World for All Ages” as their effort to raise awareness about cultural and legal issues related to the youth along with its endeavor of cease jeopardizing effects of the older generation’s growth to contribute to the community in the ways possible, paving the path to greatness. What would be a cut above activity other than bringing the two generations together and erasing the kshman rekha of ageism, but this time, there’s no Ravana to abduct Sita. Such a loftier idea of bringing together the youth and the older generations together required an equivalent amount of effort to be put, to make this event a blast. Search for old age homes ready to accommodate the younger generations began gingerly, with just a detailed plan on paper yet to be formulated. Multiple hours of brainstorming fed the idea of integrating festivals into the event, since the day had a couple of jamborees lined up. To keep up with the esteem of Janai Purnima — a ritual in Nepal followed by the Brahmins where they change the holy thread ‘janeu’, and of the consecrated month of Shrawan, we incorporated an activity of putting mehendi on the palms of women in the ashram, which would fill them up with the sense of togetherness and make them believe that they are loved and not yet abandoned by the society. To bridge the gap between the young and the old is what we were there for, leaving abundant room for us to fit in more activities; nothing could be a better meritorious behavior than to serve food and have a meal together, which was supposed be nothing other than qwati — mixture of beans cooked together like a stew. A short meeting with the volunteers made us feel less like Joakim Noah and more like Micheal Jordan, so as to have a backbone to VFC, just the way Jordan had Phil Jackson. Money is a scarce resource when on a tight budget, and having to save a couple of thousands just makes stress wrinkles pass from sight. Our volunteers, the artistic ones perhaps, flaunting their creativity, have crafted rakhis ,since 12th of august had Raksha Bandhan on its list too. With a plan of selling, it at a price consumers decide on, it was definitely for a good cause. That generated a fraction of revenue and, as said, made the stress wrinkles fade into the smiles of merriment. To prepare qwati, it has some rules; rules that cannot be broken and hence need to get implemented with strict supervision of the experienced. Paramountly, a set of beans are supposed to be kept in water overnight to tender themselves, and our shoulders had the responsibility to deliver the desired amount to the ashram a day prior to the event. Only Manish: The Youth Engagement Officer, holy spirits and I know the struggle of bearing 35 kilograms of beans, 10 liters of oil and 25 kilograms of flour on a bike for 10 whole minutes, uphill and down. It was the day of the event. Going through a gazillion speed breakers, our car had reached ‘Manav Sewa Ashram’. A clear view of the hills charged me with conviction, leaving much less room for the antipathetic. The ratio of women to men was almost balanced out, with women being more in number. Matching with the building and the surrounding itself, most females were wearing a green top, with polka dots on them, like a uniform, as their symbol of unity towards the society. Just as planned, the mehendi activity started, which involved interaction of our volunteers with the members of the ashram. I had a conversation with various people in there, and everyone had their own hardships to deal with. A woman, her sons had left her in that ashram and flew to India, without letting her know of their current placement, leaving her in distress, which forced her to flee the place twice. Her cry to go back home was miserably melancholic, with gloominess failing to turn into serenity. Beside her sat another woman who we referred to as “ama”, which translated to ‘mother’ in Nepali. She had accepted her fate and was living with it, thinking this is what would be her comfort zone after her dark and humiliating past. I heard the jolly voice of an old woman who had a slight Indian accent incorporated into her speech. I turned around and I saw a woman sitting on a plastic chair, wearing a white salwar suit, trying to call a one year old near her to play. After a few minutes of talking to her, I must say that she was the most ecstatic soul in there. She said that she was from Bombay, the land of dreams, from where she came to Kathmandu as a part of her teerth yatra. She felt free to be in Kathmandu itself, amidst the hills and how she mentions it as “the land of bhole baba” referring to the glorious temple of Pashupatinath. We not only provided them with the ration but also cooked puri and qwati as a form of celebration. Nevertheless, it was an experience of a lifetime, I felt jubilant.

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Occupational Safety Training and Health Camp

By CREASION
May 26, 2022

Creasion Nepal and Recycler Saathi successfully conducted Occupational Safety Training and Health Camp for Waste Workers in the scrap centers of Chitwan district with the support of The Coca-Cola Foundation. Waste workers from Chitwan were given training on occupational safety and were also provided with safety gear and the required equipment for the safety of the scrap centers. A medical officer also did a health checkup of all the waste workers that were present at the event. The training included a session to train the waste workers on how to properly use safety gear such as - shoes, gloves, masks, reflector jackets, medical kit, and dignity kits. \ It also included an awareness session on basic hygiene and potential occupational risks followed by a medical health check-up. Furthermore, the scrap centers were also equipped with safety amenities and fire extinguishers to prevent and tackle potential workplace fire hazards. In addition to that, an awareness tool, and infographics with basic safety protocols were also provided at each location for future reference.

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Responsible consumption and production to address waste

By Phurpa Sherpa
May 06, 2022

I was in my final year in my undergraduate when my supervisor asked me to conduct an academic research on waste management. It took me a month to carry out the research on the waste management system in Nepal where I visited the transfer station in Teku and the landfill site in Nuwakot. After personally meeting the waste workers, I understood that there were plenty of gaps in the waste management system in Nepal. This followed a year of academic research on waste which drastically changed my life. I went from hating waste to understanding, loving and valuing it. Looking at the past success and failure waste project records in Nepal, I realized that we didn’t need big-budget projects and technological development to manage waste in Nepal. The only solution that I found after reviewing the rules, regulations, policies and past practices for managing waste in Nepal was the need to segregate waste at the source. However, managing and segregating waste at the source is not an easy task. The Solid Waste Management Act 2011, Article 6 mentions that waste needs to be segregated at the source but there aren’t any monitoring units to inspect if the rule is strictly followed. People often complain that even though they follow the rules and segregate waste at the source, the bio-degradable and non-degradable waste are not separately collected. When segregated waste is loaded in a single van, the waste needs to be segregated at the collection center. However, there are few companies such as NEPCEMAC in Swoyambhu and Maharajgunj, and government bodies such as Bhaktapur municipality successfully practicing segregation at source and have successfully segregated and managed waste. Waste won't be waste anymore if we change our behavior towards it and strive to reduce, reuse and recycle these valuable resources. Many plastics can be reused and PET bottles can be baled and recycled into useful products. Similarly, unwanted clothes can be recycled and re-design into a new useful product, and degradable waste can be used to make compost for urban gardens. Entrepreneurial solutions to waste not only address waste but also saves time, effort, and resources to recreate that product. It ultimately promotes the economic development of the country. Despite wise production and consumption of products such as producing less or zero use of plastic and consuming less packaged food, supporting start-ups that promote environment-friendly products will ultimately solve the waste management problems in Nepal. If we change our perception of waste and understand the value of these discarded products, the waste system in our country can be properly managed. Let us hope we develop a better understanding of waste in our society and much of the useful waste will cease to exist. The author is associated with CREASION and leads the Climate Smart Entrepreneurship – key component of Nepali Yuwa in Climate Action and Growth project funded by European Union. 

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Kathmandu’s waste: a problem or a resource?

By Sushila Shrestha
Apr 22, 2022

My house is in Kirtipur, whereas my office is in Baluwatar. This means that I have to travel almost one and half hours by bus every day. Like most commuters, my favorite pastime on the bus is to look outside of the window but oftentimes, my morning relish is disrupted by the sight of overwhelming heaps of garbage lying on the roads. According to the Waste Management Baseline Survey of Nepal conducted by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) in 2020, Kathmandu waste comprises three broad categories of waste. These are organic waste, inorganic waste, and other waste. Organic waste mainly consists of paper, textile, and agricultural waste; whereas inorganic waste comprises of plastic, glass, rubbers, metals and minerals. Every day, the Kathmandu Valley generates around 1200 metric tonnes of solid waste. Such waste is first collected at the Teku transfer station from various municipal collection services. And from the station, the waste is dispatched to Sisdole- a landfill that is already filled beyond its capacity. Waste that is not collected by the municipal services is dumped openly in the street, burned, or disposed of by the riverbanks. So, is waste a problem in Kathmandu? Improper waste management practices in Kathmandu have resulted in various environmental issues, caused fatal accidents, infrastructure damage, pollution of the local environment, off-gassing of methane generated by decaying organic wastes, and proliferation of disease vectors such as rats and flies. Hence, it is no doubt that solid waste is indeed a problem in Kathmandu. Can this waste be used as a resource? The waste composition analysis done by the Asian Development Bank indicates that the highest waste fraction is of organic matter (66%), followed by plastics (12%), paper and paper products (9%), others (5%), and glass (3%). Metal, textiles, rubber and leather each account for 2% or less. The high amount of the organic waste composition indicates that if segregated properly, most of the waste i.e., organic waste can be composted. This would reduce the waste management problem by half. Similarly, there is a market for most recyclable materials like plastics, metals, and glasses because of the demand created by the formal and informal waste management sectors. Hence, these materials, if segregated and recycled properly, can be immensely helpful to turn the waste into a resource. Ultimately, in the future, our strategies and approach to waste will decide if the waste is regarded as a problem or as a valuable resource.

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Imagining Zero-Waste

By Sujata Koirala
Apr 18, 2022

Social media can easily persuade people to purchase anything by shoving them into their news feed. Making these purchases, we overlook the trash generated in packaging on the purchase of food, beverages, or any other commodity. We are engrossed and busy with work and family but we fail to recognize the environmental impact of our modern lifestyle. While most people may not think much about waste, there are some of us who think about it. In fact, there are companies and organizations that have made it their business to figure out how to generate less, how to dispose of less, and how to define when we achieve some variation of a ‘Zero Waste’ goal. Zero Waste refers to the conservation of resources through responsible production, consumption, reuse, and recovery of products, packaging, and materials without incineration or discharges to land, water, or air which threaten environment and human health. Zero waste may sound simple but it is a complex phenomenon. The idea is being developed and implemented in various sectors including waste management and treatment, mining, manufacturing, and urban development. The zero-waste concept has been embraced by policymakers because it stimulates sustainable production and consumption, optimum recycling and resource recovery. Nepal has taken the goal to reach Net Zero Emissions by 2045 as part of their commitment towards a global goal. For that, many components need to be overviewed accordingly. Introducing the concept of zero waste can leverage the goal a little further. However, transforming high consuming big cities such as Kathmandu and Pokhara might be difficult in its first phase. But it is essential to understand human behavior in the consumption of resources and generation of waste. ‘Zero Waste City’ design strategies are significantly influenced by lifestyle, values, and personal behavior. Raising awareness and educational programs to trigger behavior change are becoming increasingly important. The sheer volume of waste is one of the prime concerns in zero waste cities. Therefore, introducing mechanisms to avoid, minimize or prevent the creation of waste is one of the key challenges for all urban cities. In zero waste city design, material flow of the city should be designed or controlled in a balanced way, considering sustainable design and product stewardship concepts. Technology applied in waste management systems needs to be adaptable to the context of future volume reduction and resource recovery from waste. Policies and regulations have significantly influenced the development of waste management systems and cities should continue to use them. Zero waste seems difficult but it is possible but it all starts with us. If we can imagine it, its attainable not impossible.

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Being Responsible for Waste

By Monica Khadka
Apr 02, 2022

Do you ever think about what happens to waste after waste workers pick it from your home? The answer depends on where you live. If you live in the United States or Germany, chances are that waste has been taken care of responsibly; if you are living in Nepal or Chile, its less likely. Globally, the demand for diverting waste from landfills and incinerators towards the economy through recycling is increasing. A few countries have even banned landfills to implement recycling. Manufacturers have had to take responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale. However, landfills still remain the major disposal method for many countries. On the contrary, a few countries even lack proper landfill sites and resort to practices such as dumping. It is estimated that humans will create about 4 billion tons of waste by 2100 (Global Citizen, 2016), 78 years from now. Without proper waste management, the pollution we cause will ultimately affect human health and the environment. Countries such as Germany, Poland, or Estonia are already making improvement in their waste management sector but what about us? More specifically, what about our country Nepal where the waste management sector still needs great improvement? If you are like me, you probably do not operate a waste management company. You are neither in a position to make policy level changes, nor can you control the consumption and production patterns in our country. So, what can we do? Not all waste is recycled and these wastes remain on our lands or the oceans for a long time. To limit the damage done to the environment, the least that we can do is minimize the waste we generate and segregate our waste at home. If you’re throwing away something sharp or broken, make sure you seal so that waste pickers don’t cut themselves. Try to compost, recycle, reuse, or upcycle whenever possible. Finally, we can educate ourselves to become responsible waste creator by going online or connecting with organizations, businesses, and individuals who are already working towards the improvement of the waste management sector. I am sure that a lot of points were missed out on what an individual can do on a personal level to contribute to the improvement of the waste management sector. In the future, if you happen to own a waste management company, please make sure you treat your waste workers well, invest in the right technologies and machineries, and collaborate with the government and relevant stakeholders to find efficient ways to conserve our planet, that we call home. I am not sure if we can ever be waste-free, but I do believe that we can find solutions to the problem of waste management if we all just try from our own level.

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A Look into Plastics

By Pratik Bajracharya
Mar 11, 2022

Plastic, an all-familiar material, was accidentally invented in 1846 by German chemist Christian Schonbein. He discovered ‘cellulose nitrate’, the world’s first synthetic plastic by mixing nitrate and sulfuric acid with cellulose found in plants and trees. Since then, many scientists tried to work with natural polymers and cellulose derivatives. Currently, plastics are derived from materials found in nature, such as natural gas, oil, coal, minerals, and plants. In early 1900s, another German scientist found natural and synthetic materials consisting of large molecules in form of chains, and ever since we define plastic as polymers of a long carbon chain. There has been an abrupt increase in plastic production since World War 2. The world produces more than 380 million tons of plastic every year. More than half the total amount of plastic produced was brought to market after 2000. It is expected that plastic production will further increase to about 600 million tons in 2025. Plastics are used in everyday packaging materials, building and construction, automotive, electronics, household utilities, agriculture, medical fields, and so on. This high consumption is due to its advantage, flexibility, and cost. About 40% of all plastics produced are thrown away within a month which either ends up in landfills or in the marine ecosystem. While plastic disintegrates into small pieces and generates greenhouse gases in a landfill, it doesn’t degrade in the marine ecosystem, and the plastic either for a hundred thousand years or bioaccumulates in the food ecosystem. Ergo, think carefully before using plastics.

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How to Manage Household Waste?

By Pratik Bajracharya
Feb 18, 2022

 Here are 5 tips for effective waste management at home. At home, we can help in decreasing plastic waste by following ways that can be followed by anyone, regardless of their location. First things first, support the option of recycling. Some of the plastic waste can be recycled easily, and you will find many ways to send your household waste to different plants. Various online platforms such as Khalisisi, Doko Recyclers, and Kabaadi are at your doorstep. Thulo Kawadi arranges for pickups in areas and pays according to the market rate. Itinerant buyers in the cycle also visit the neighborhood on a weekly basis to collect recyclables. Refuse plastic bags while shopping and prefer to use reusable bags as much as you can. If you use the same bag more than a few times, you are reducing a good amount of plastic that’s added to landfills every other day. Try to use products that are made from recycled plastic. This will help and support companies that deal in such products and will be a big boost to waste management in general. In most cases, people buy food products packed in plastic jars and packets, which is again something that can be skipped with more careful choices. You will find most products in glass jars, which are reusable and can be utilized for other things at home. It’s high time to take waste management seriously and start it from home. Avoid double-packaged products wherever you can. Bulk packaging often uses more plastic and wrapped papers and can be skipped easily. If you are careful enough, you can reduce some of the most common plastic wastes that are being dumped in landfills and even in rivers regularly. It takes collaborative effort to do good things, and you can take the first leap to inspire others.

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Occupational Safety Training and Health Camp for the waste workers of Budhanilkantha

By CREASION
Feb 18, 2022

On February 18, 2022, the CREASION team headed to Budhanilkantha to organize an Occupational Safety Training and Health Camp for the waste workers of Budhanilkantha. Waste Workers face many occupational challenges which are not addressed most of the times. In order to address these challenges and tackle any occupational and safety challenges, the team conducted the training to teach about the safety measures to take while working in the scrap centers, handling of any health emergencies as well as using of fire extinguishers and handling cases of fire properly. Recycler Saathi acts as an ally to uplift the occupational condition of the waste workers with the support of The Coca-cola Foundation and Bottlers Nepal Ltd.

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My view on Sustainable Development

By Monica Khadka
Feb 11, 2022

I am not a specialist on the topic of sustainable development however, I do know a few things about it. In this article, I’d like to share my opinion on the topic of sustainable development and my relationship with it. The beauty of the internet is this; everything that we want to know about is there. We just need to be curious and disciplined enough to learn. However, sometimes that is not enough. The internet is a vast space that contains a lot of different information. It is important to learn to know how and where to look for sources that are credible. My first introduction on the topic of Sustainable Development might have been in school but I don’t remember it being such an important topic. It could be because of the teacher’s teaching style. But that’s another topic for another day. My proper introduction to Sustainable Development has been through the internet. If you asked me to explain what Sustainable Development means right now, I would say that it is a development pattern that is beneficial not just to the individual who is pursuing the ‘development’ but also to his/her immediate surroundings such as their community, bio-diversity, and future. Sustainable Development is an unselfish and compassionate way to pursue development; this is what I would say. On the other hand, how do the experts define sustainable development? One expert, the Sustainable Development Commission UK, defines sustainable development as “development that meets the needs of the present, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Let’s take an example of a wood company who wants to make more money (development). For this purpose, they clear forests after forests which definitely leads to their growth (especially their bank balance) however they’ve put both themselves and other future wood companies in danger by leaving no forest behind to source from. This not only affects their bank balance, but the ecosystem in which they live where now there are not enough trees in the environment to help create Oxygen. Not only that, suddenly a few birds and animals are left without homes because they of the way the wood company pursued their ‘development’. Personally, I am a fairly environmentally conscious individual. This means that I try to make decisions that are good for our environment. Since, I do not own a large factory or business in which my environmental impact is big, I try to do the little that I can. Most of the time, I will take my own shopping bag while going out. I carry a water bottle to avoid buying water in a plastic bottle. I switch off the electricity when not in use and try to be mindful of my water consumption. I purchase environment-friendly products if they are available in the market such as bamboo toothbrushes, chemical-free soaps, or environment-friendly sanitary napkins. Finally, I look forward to the day when environmental products are available and affordable in all shops and supermarkets. Most importantly, I look forward to living in a world where organizations and institutions in power, such as the government and corporations, pursue development ‘without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.’ Until then, I will do my best to support and live a sustainable lifestyle. This is easy now as all the information is just a click away. I hope that you too can afford to live a sustainable lifestyle and together we can leave this world a better place than we found it.

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My relationship with plastic!

By Sushila Shrestha
Feb 04, 2022

Scrolling through YouTube a cold January morning, a video recommendation caught my eye. The thumbnail had a picture of a turtle bleeding through its nose. Curiously, I watched the whole 8-minute video. What I saw broke my heart and began my journey with plastics. The whole video was about the turtle who had a 10-12 cm ‘PLASTIC STRAW’ lodged into its nostril. A researcher, who had accidentally found the turtle, was trying to remove the straw. A process looked excruciatingly painful and was difficult to watch. It had me thinking, “Is there anything I can do so that another sea life would not have to suffer this fate?” The following days, I tried being conscious of my plastic consumption. I maintained a diary where I underlined every product or activity that comprised of plastic. “The alarm clock woke me up in the morning. Doing my daily chores, I took my spectacles from the side-table, and warmed some water in the electric jug. I went to the bathroom with my slippers on and kept pea-sized toothpaste on my pink toothbrush. I checked my emails on my laptop and to start my work. “Hungry after a while, I put a teabag on the warm water, and enjoyed some cookies out of the packet. I went grocery shopping and came back with a grocery bag. I kept the groceries in jars and washed the vegetables in a bucket. My brother helped me to cut the vegetables with a knife on the cutting board. After lunch, I washed the dishes with a dishwashing brush and sponge. “I got a call from a friend to meet up. We went at Kathmandu Fun Park and wanted to ride the roller coaster. For this, I withdrew some money from my ATM card. The day was good as we even got to eat some fast food from the nearby fast-food service. I returned home on a bike from ‘Pathao’.“It was pretty late when I came back home. I was tired and wanted to sleep. So, I quickly took my diary and started writing my routine with a pen.” I was quite shocked when I underlined every product or activity that involved plastic. I was using plastic in my early morning routine and throughout my daily activities. This routine didn’t even include plastics used for various medical purposes. Plastic has become ubiquitous in today’s world and I have to accept it in my life. Avoiding plastics today would be like living in the stone age. But how can I, and people like me, be responsible for our plastic consumption without compromising our lifestyle? I realized that the answer is simple. It lies in the magic of 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. Anything we don’t need; we can reduce and refuse it. Any plastic product that we cannot refuse, we can reuse it based on its lifecycle. And anything that we cannot reduce or reuse can be given to recycling facilities like Recycler Sathi, where it can get a new life in a new shape and form. Ergo, my relationship with plastic went from love to hate and from hate to understanding. I cannot completely discard plastic consumption but there is one thing that I can surely do: USE IT RESPONSIBLY!

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What is Recycling and why is it important?

By Shyam Subedi
Jan 31, 2022

Recycling is the process of converting waste materials into reusable objects to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, energy usage, air pollution, and water pollution by decreasing the need for ‘conventional’ waste disposal and lowering greenhouse gas emissions compared to plastic production. Recycling is a key component of modern waste reduction, and an important component of the ‘Reduce, Reuse and Recycle’ waste hierarchy. Why is It important? The advantages of recycling are numerous; everyone benefits when we recycle on a regular basis. Whether it is a community effort to help beautify the neighborhood or assist a corporation and save hundreds to thousands of financial resources on waste management. Environmental Advantages 1. People can prevent millions of tons of material from entering landfills by recycling, freeing up space for rubbish that can't be repurposed. They account for enormous methane emissions, a potent greenhouse gas. Landfills destroy the environment while also detracting the city's aesthetic appeal. 2. Recycling decreases raw material extraction requirements (mine, quarrying, and logging), refining, and processing, all of which pollute the air and water. Increased recycling can considerably reduce toxins emissions into air and water. 3. Recycling lowers greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere by saving energy and helps combat climate change. It is now easier than ever to help the environment since there are so many more recyclable things including electronics, plastics, batteries, and light bulbs to name a few. Reduce and Reuse are important but as for the things that already exist: Recycle.

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Travel and New Experience

By Thinley Doma Ghale
Jan 17, 2022

As the cool air crisps in the wind, the cold winter gives wake to reality. The mountains so ever clear and the white snow covering--makes it look like a dream. The traveling started from the laps of the Himalayas in Pokhara where all of us were excited for the trip on Christmas. Walking beside the lakeside, experiencing bonfires, and sharing experiences with newer faces was exquisite. From the laps of the Himalayas, we traveled to the flatlands of the Terai. The warm weather greeted us without much harshness from the cool crispy air from the Himalayas. The main objective of the trip to Chitwan was to interact with the children of Waste Smart Schools and youths of Volunteer for Change. It was so mesmerizing to see the knowledge and passion the children had for the plantation—and they made excellent gardeners. These young beings having a strong dignified relationship with the Earth was a surprise to someone who grew up in the concrete jungles of Kathmandu. It made me realize the importance of being grounded and connected to nature. Children and youths have always inspired me. Interacting with the children of Waste Smart School, I reminisced my school days: the early teenage, naughtiness, but mostly the time and passion to discover, and enthusiasm to learn more about the world. Curious as a bean, the interaction started off with a session of introductions and team-building games, followed by tree plantation. The knowledge these children had and the strength they carried was something I could learn from and I have lived all my life in the city. It was a new experience: the effort needed for digging, the life-giving elements of manure, and the optimum village life were all new aspects to grow. Moreover, it made me realize that the food we eat and the vegetables sold in the markets are forms of love and appreciation from the farmers. It showed a whole new world on living—even the smallest things take a lot of time, appreciation, and love to gather and grow. As my mother always says, “Children are the world’s best teachers. Their imagination and views open a new dimension to the people learning and gaining knowledge from them.” Similarly, the youths of Chitwan made an eye-opening impact on learning how to be humble and grounded, that the simple things in life are most precious. Interacting with the Volunteer for Change Chitwan was a new experience. Along with that, an interactive session of a mock election was conducted by the iCAP team. With limited knowledge of politics, it showcased the importance of voting and voting the right way. The session was pretty eventful which was informative and a fun experience. Overall, my 2021 ended on a good term with wonderful experiences and a grateful heart.

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MY EXPERINCE VOLUNTEERING IN CREASION

By Sambida Wagle
Dec 21, 2021

Working as a volunteer for VFC through CREASION has been amazing so far and I’m sure this feeling will remain the same forever. Volunteerism is a great concept in itself and with VFC it’s a cherry on top. VFC gives the finest opportunities that contribute a lot to your well-being and I am not an exception. That feeling when you contribute your best effort for the betterment of society is unexplainable. It’s been only a month and I have already met with some incredible personalities who have taught me the pure essence of life; how our daily activities affect the environment, society and the way that I look upon certain things have definitely changed. I’ve been upping my social interaction. This is also majorly possible because of our amazing team which has a blend of ample active and creative minds. Since everyone here is senior to me, I’ve been getting a lot of guidance due to which I’ve been aware of many things and their advice shall help me forever. All in all, this is one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life and I am super proud of myself.

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MY EXPERIENCE WORKING WITH VOLUNTEER FOR CHANGE (VFC)

By Creasion
Dec 21, 2021

My experience of working with VFC has been very much constructive, worthwhile, rewarding, joyful, and full of entertainment. It's hard to explain but in this short period of time, I got to know a great team full of so many energetic friends, brothers, and sisters. Being a part of the team, I have learned many things that I had never thought of before. From the first day of meeting at VFC, I have been able to create small improvements upon myself which I think will help me and has been helping me in these days. being a part of the team I think I have been able to know myself and about the environment, society a lot more than before. I have learned that our little effort upon any good changes can contribute a lot.

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The Children of the Flatlands

By Abish Man Shakya
Sep 27, 2021

I’ve lived in Kathmandu all my life and staying in Chitwan has been a revelation. At the river banks of Shivaghat where CREASION’s regional office resides, you wake up to the cool breeze of Narayani before the sun comes up before the heat reminds you that Chitwan isn’t all romantic after all. Besides the heat, there is less to complain. Frankly, I didn’t get to explore much of the city so comparing these places wouldn’t be fair. But at least on the outskirts in Bharatpur, the wide roads seem endless and there are more green fields and trees than houses and people. What I observed was that there were lots of kids (and even adults) playing in the fields in their leisure. The children and youth come out from their houses to play football, volleyball and cricket as the sun makes its way down the hill. Sunsets are another beautiful part of Chitwan with golden fields as the heat dissipates when evening comes calling. At a local park, some get together for cardio workout and others for karate. Then there are some like me who aimlessly cycle and find a shore where I rest and gaze into the free-flowing Narayani. Though I spent most of my time by this river, I was mostly engaged with kids that reside close to the Rapti river. Towards the West are the youths of Kasara and on the East are youths of Sauraha. The lives of these school children have fascinated me as it is a complete opposite of Kathmandu. Youths in the capital ride motorbikes but here they ride bicycles. It was heartwarming to see them slowly and steadily peddle everywhere often giving their friends a lift in their back. As I interacted with them, I found some to be extroverted and others to quite shy but what’s common with them is their inquisitiveness to learn new things. Even though I only spent only a brief amount of time with each group with workshops, they have learned much and are ever hungry to learn more. These kids live on the outskirts of cities and their natural way of living is much more sustainable than their consumption driven counterparts in the cities. Over here, they farm food in their own fields. While I was explaining them about waste segregation, plenty of my efforts felt redundant as they have always been doing it. Some even sort the recyclables and non-recyclables waste for better waste disposal. But despite the collective efforts of many to keep their place clean, the negligence and leniency of some mean that the surroundings are littered with unwanted debris. Residing close to the buffer zone, the children wholeheartedly understand the importance of keeping their surrounding clean. They frequently and voluntarily conduct cleaning campaigns and plant trees. The children understand and empathize that the health of humans, the biodiversity and the planet are intertwined. After all, they’re often visited by their neighbors: the rhinos. They teach what they have learned to their juniors. There is fire in their bellies when they talk about keeping our planet clean. When they talk, some might listen, but when they perform and everyone can see. The children aren’t just a hope of the future but hope for the present. They might not be in a position to make the major decisions but they do what they can from their position. They are the young guardians and I have faith in them as the guardians that will protect their home. Chitwan, like every other place, is going through rapid transformation but I hope they never lose the essence of the place: the greenery, the river, and even the heat. I hope the children will always remain cheerful and the children of today will pass on the same conservation values they have instilled in themselves.

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डोल्पा मेरो सपना मेरो अनुभब

By विद याक (विनोद शाही)
Sep 06, 2021

१७ बर्ष सम्म निरन्तर बर्षेनी १०/१२ दिनको त्यो यात्रा, भिन्न भिन्न सहयात्रीहरु संगको त्यो अविस्मरणीय र रोमान्चक यात्रा । कहिले ढुंगा खस्ने कहिले पहिरो कहिँले हिउँमा फस्ने कति कति कठ्यांग्रिने रातहरुको निराशा र जीवन मृत्युका संघर्षहरु । चिसो नदिहरु थिचोल्दै साघुरो गोरेटोहरु हुदै, हिउँमा चिप्लेटी खेल्दै बिकराल हिमशिखरहरु माथिको विजय उत्सवहरु । असुविधाहरु, अभाबहरुसंगै अशिक्षा अज्ञानता चेतनाको कमि जस्ता अन्धकार मा फाइदा उठाईरहेका विकृत भ्रष्ट मनस्थितिका व्यक्तिहरुसंगको लामो युद्ध । युद्ध लडेर होइन, कर्म बाट विजय प्राप्त गर्दै । फरक भाषा, संस्कृति जीवनमा घिल्मिल हुदै रोम्बा (बाहिरको मान्छे)को उपनाम देखि उनीहरुको हुरी मी (हाम्रो मान्छे), लामा, घाँग्ज़ोङ सर Sir of the Himalayas को उपाधि उपनाम पाएको सम्मको यात्रा । अहिले सम्झिदा हिजो जस्तो लाग्छ सबैले नजा नजा भन्दा भन्दै सबैलाई रुवाएर डोल्पा तिर लागेको पनि १६,१७ बर्ष पुगेछ । समाज सेवामा दत्त चित्त भएर बिद्यालय पछी देखि लागेरहें पनि मेरो पहिलो लक्ष्य भनेको चित्रकला, अभिनय नै थियो । जीवन मृत्युको संघर्ष गर्दै बिकराल हिमशिखर पार गरि पुग्नु पर्ने उप्पल्लो डोल्पा पुगें पछी देखि मेरा सबै इच्छा आकांक्षालाई त्याग गरि मैले सम्पूर्ण जीवन यहि ठाउँको लागि नै समर्पित गर्छु भन्ने प्रण गरें । यति दुख कष्ट हुदाहुदैपनि थाहा छैन किन त्यो ठाउँ संग यति धेरै लगाब भयो । संगै गएका साथीहरु बर्षदिन तथा केहि महिना पनि बस्न सकेन । त्यहाँ बाट पलायन भएका केहि स्थानीयहरुले नै हाम्रो ठाउँ त धेरै गार्हो छ यस्तो ठाउँ मा पनि को बस्छ भन्थ्यो । हुन त मलाई पनि शुरुवातका दिनहरुमा त्रास, निराशा, बहिस्कार, तिरस्कार चित्त दुखाइले गर्दा त्यो ६ महिना को कार्यकाल सके पछी कहिले नफर्किने गरि जान्छु भन्ने लागेको थियो । तर त्यी बालबालिकाहरु, गाउँले साथीभाई आमा दिदीबहिनीहरु किन किन आफनै लाग्न थाल्यो । त्यी सब बिचरा लाग्थ्यो कति दुख हो । बच्चा होस् बृद्ध होस् सबैले दुख गर्नै पर्ने । केवल सामान्य आधारभूत आबस्यकता पुरा गर्न पनि कति दुख गर्नु पर्ने । बाह्रौं शताब्दीका जस्तै यहाँका मानिसहरु केबल गाँस बास र कपासका लागि मात्र कडा मेहनत गर्दै गोबर टिप्दै, भेडाच्यांग्रा चउँदै, ऊन बुन्दै, याक संग बर्षेनी हिउँद तल्लो डोल्पातिर बसाईसराई गर्दै प्रकृति संग संघर्ष गर्दै कठिन जीवनयापन गर्दैछन् । यहि अवस्था देखेर उहाहरुका लागि त्यो ठाउँका लागि केहि गर्नु पर्छ भन्ने लाग्यो । र यहि मेरो देश र यो समाज को लागि केहि गर्ने अवसर हो भन्ने प्रबल भावना मनमा आए पछी मैले यहि क्षेत्र को लागि केहि गर्छु भन्ने प्रण गरें र बिशेष रुपमा त्यो क्षेत्र को शैक्षिक विकासमा आफुलाई समर्पित गर्दैगएं । शुरुमा बिकट भूगोल, भिन्न संस्कृति, भाषा, सचेतनाको कमि र फोहोरी राजनीति आदि कारणले त्यहाको समुदाय संग भिज्न उनिहरुबाट आफ्नो हो भन्ने स्वकार्य हुन नै धेरै संघर्ष गर्नु पर्यो | अर्को विकास, स्वस्थ, शिक्षाको महत्व बुझाउदै बालबालिका हरुलाई कक्षा कोठा सम्म ल्याउन पनि अर्को ठुलो संघर्ष थियो | उहाहरुकै भाषा, भेषभुषा सिक्दै जीवन सस्कृति लाई अंगाल्दै भिज्दै उहाहरुलाई सचेत बनाउदै गएँ । पठनपाठन र कक्षा कोठामा मात्र आफुलाई सिमित नराखी अतिरिक्त क्रियाकलाप, आफुले जानेका जीवन जगतका कुराहरु सिकाउन सुनाउन थाल्यौं । विद्यार्थीले मात्र नभएर अभिभाबकले पनि सिक्नु पर्छ भन्ने हेतुले प्रौद्ध कक्षासंचालन गरें । शुक्रबार शनिबार बिदाका दिनहरुलाई सदुपयोग गर्दै ४/५ घण्टा हिडेर हिमालपरिको गाउँ जान्थें । त्यहाका बिद्यालय आउन नपाउने बालबालिकाहरुलाई पढाउथ्यें । घाउ चोटपटक लागेकाका लागि मलमपट्टी र पोलियो,भिटामिन ए, जुका का औषधिहरु वितरण गर्न गाउँ गाउँ घर घर पुग्थ्यौं । संगै काठमाण्डौबाट औषधि र अरु आबस्यक सामग्रीहरु संकलन गरि स्वास्थ्य केन्द्रमा वितरण पनि गरें । संचालनमा नआएको क्याराभान हिरो थिन्लेको स्वस्थ्यकेन्द्रमा मेरा पुर्व विद्यार्थी नर्सलाई स्वास्थ्यकर्मीको रुपमा पनि नियुक्त गरेर स्वास्थ्य सेवा प्रदान गर्न लगाए । शे चाकांग गुम्बामा पुराना धार्मिक पुस्तक हरुको संरक्षण गर्न छोर्तेन स्तुपा निर्माण गर्न सहयोग जुताइदिएं । पछी सरकार ले स्थापना गरिदिएका तर कहिले संचालन मा नआएका विद्यालय हरु पुन: स्थापना गर्ने अभियान शुरु गरें त्यहि शिलशिलामा शे फोकसुन्दो गाउँ पालिका अन्तर्गत कोमा गाउँ मा सन् २००८ मा श्री दशरथचन्द आधारभूत विद्यालय र निजालगाउँमा सन् २०१० यांग्जेर गुम्बा आधारभूत विद्यालय स्थानीय साथीहरुसंग मिलेर पुनस्थापना गरें । भर्खरको युवा अवस्थामा जीवनको लक्ष्य के हो भनि सोध्दा म नायक - वास्तविक जीवन को नायक बन्न चाहन्छु भन्थ्यें । त्यहि नायक बन्ने प्रबल चाहना ले गर्दा म अपराध संग लड्ने क्राइम फाइटर बन्ने विचार गरे (धन्न त्यो विचार त्यागें र कुनै गलत बाटो गएन छु) । त्यही नायक बन्ने चाहनाले म सामाजिक कार्यहरुमा लागि परें र त्यहि नायक बन्ने कोशिसमा देश कै सबभन्दा दुर्गम उपल्लो डोल्पा पुर्यायो र डोल्पा को शैक्षिक बिकासमा यति धेरै गर्ने आँट र जोश दियो । सांच्चै नायक बने कि भन्ने भान पनि भयो । तर त्यो संगै नायक बन्नु, रक्षक बन्नु, भगवान बन्नु कति सम्म उचित छ कति जायज छ भन्ने प्रश्नहरु आफैभित्र उठ्दैगयो । नायक बन्ने, भगवान बन्ने कोशिसमा समाजलाई झन् हामीले विचरा पात्र बनाउदैछौँ कि झन् हामीले उनीहरुलाई नायक र भगवान को मात्रै अपेक्षा गर्ने बनाउदै छौँ कि । र हामी जस्ता कति नायक भगवानहरुले साँच्चै नै उहाँहरुको को लागि काम गर्दैछौं कि आफनै स्वार्थ आफ्नै राजनीति, प्रभुत्व जमाउने र मागी खाने भाडो बनाउन मात्र काम गर्दैछौं भन्ने कुराहरु, विचारहरु मनमा आउन थाल्यो । यस्तै यस्तै कुराहरुलाइ मनन गरी कुनै नायक वा भगवानको मात्र अपेक्षा गर्ने भन्दा हामी सबैले आफैले आफ्नो गाउँ समुदायको विकास प्रगतिमा कसैको भर नपरी आफैले केहि गरेर आफै नायक बन्न अभिप्रेरित गर्दै सबैलाई जिम्मेवार बनाउने उदेश्यले नेपाली मात्र को साथ सहयोग मा स्कूल शुरु गर्यौं र समुहका साथीहरु स्थानीय उपत्यका लगाएत सुगम सहर का र बिश्व भरिका नेपालीहरुबाट साथ पाएर डोल्पा भरि यो अभियान अन्तर्गत धेरै गाउँहरुमा विस्तार गर्यौं । डोल्पा जस्तो दुर्गम यो एक नौलो कठिन किसिमको कार्यक्रम थियो । संसार एकातिर र म अर्को तिर थिए । संसार जसरि चल्दैथियो त्यो भन्दा अर्को बाटो म लागिरहेको थिए । संसार जसरी चल्दैछ त्यो भन्दा मैले जुन बाटो रोजे त्यो चाहिं वास्तविक आबस्यकता हो भन्ने मलाई पूर्ण विश्वास थियो । कतिले यसरी पनि हुन्छ यो त हुने सक्दैन नेपाली ले सियो त बनाएको छैन कहाँ आफैले स्कूल गाउँ विकास गर्न सक्छ भन्ने कुरा हरु आए । तर पनि मेरो आफ्नो कर्म, लक्ष्यमा मलाई पुरा विश्वास थियो । यहि नै अहिले को परम आबस्यकता हो भनि आफ्नो पथमा अथक र निरन्तर लागि परें र अन्त्य मा धेरै संघर्ष पछी मैले संसारको साथ पाएँ । १ विद्यालय, ३२ जना विद्यार्थी र हामी २,३ जना शिक्षकहरुबाट शुरु भएको यो कार्यक्रममा अहिले सम्म ६१ जना स्वयंसेवक याक शिक्षकहरुबाट १६ विद्यालयहरु , १६००+ विद्यार्थीहरुलाई लाभाम्बित भएका छन् । डोल्पा को १३% जनसंख्यालाई हामीले सचेत बनाएका छौं । स्थानीय समुदाय देखि लिएर देश विदेशबाट हजारौ लाखौ साथी सहयोगीहरु, युवा, बालबालिका, गृहिणी आमा दिदिहरुले साथ दिनु भएको छ । यो एक चरणको काम त पुरा भयो हामीले हाम्रोसमाज, दुर्गम क्षेत्र र देशका लागि जिम्मेवार हुन अभिप्रेरित त गर्यौं जिम्मेवारी संगै सक्षमता सिप पनि प्रदान गर्दै जानु अति आबस्यक छ । शिक्षामा आमुल परिवर्तन ल्याउन, संगै शिक्षा संग स्थानीय जीवन, संस्कृति, कुसल नेतृत्व, ब्यबस्थापन क्षमता विकास, सामाजिक- आर्थिक विकास जोडिनु पर्छ । यो सब गर्न म क्रियसन नेपालमा आबद्ध भएर कर्णाली शिक्षा अभियान प्रारम्भ गरेका छौं । कर्णाली शिक्षा अभियानको यो अभियानबाट हामीले सक्षम विद्यार्थी, युवा, महिला समुदायको नेतृत्व मा एक नमुना गाउँ बनाइ देश र विश्वलाई सकारात्मक संदेश र उत्प्रेरणा दिने हाम्रो उदेश्य छ । क्रियसन नेपालका साथी सहकर्मीहरुको साथ सहकार्य मा यो सपना पनि पुरा हुदै गरेको देख्दैछु ।

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Why Volunteer?

By Abish Man Shakya
Aug 23, 2021

UN Youth classifies youth as young people between the age of 15 to 24. At this age, young people are still growing physically and mentally, getting new ideas and shaping thoughts that eventually shape their life. Without responsibilities on their shoulder, it is an opportunity to explore, experiment, and experience the essence of life. The youths have great energy and vigor. They are restless and look for ways to harness the energy and put them in good use. Given the right platform, they can do wonders but have every change of a misdirection. At this time, it is crucial that we engage youths in activities that are useful and meaningful. The right platform will develop compassion in the youth that will learn that the world is not only their but one that they share. To ability to empathize is crucial for young people to become sensible citizens of the future. At this age, learning should be the priority of youths. Despite education being the primary driving force for their development, it comes with limitations that are dependent on infrastructures and resources available at schools. The additional experience to develop themselves as youth come from the experiences outside the classroom. The youths require exposure to develop communication and leadership skills, and the confidence to immerse in the real world. One such great opportunity is volunteerism. Based on the values of altruism, volunteering is an opportunity to provide invaluable service to the community and serve selflessly. A volunteer dedicates their energy and time to a cause genuinely with the sheer purpose of helping people. There is nothing in volunteering except for the joy they bring to the faces of people by putting someone else’s needs above yours. By volunteering, we are not waiting for someone else to bring the change but acting with compassion to bring the change we envision. Society has many problems and could use a helping hand. It could be helping someone cross the road or planting trees, but whatever you are doing, you are working as an individual dedicated to serve the collective and the community. One may ask: Why should we volunteer? We should volunteer because we are human and it is our moral obligation to make our world a better place tomorrow than it is today. Adults maybe busy with their commitments but youths have expendable time to solve many problems that simply need a helping hand. And after all, youth is period of transition from a dependent young person to an independent adult and altruism is one such important value that youths should learn so that they can become responsible adults in the future. There is always be a need for volunteers in our communities and it is an opportunity that every youth should take. After all, volunteerism instills the values of compassion in the youth to work on a better tomorrow. Without volunteers, there would be chaos in times of disaster and any public event. Without volunteers, it would be difficult to carry out communal activities. To bring a sense of belongingness and order in society, we wouldn’t be able to make do without it. For those who have finished high school and haven’t graduated, volunteering is a great opportunity to make the most out of their leisure time to really connect with the community. If you aren’t involved in anything at the moment, keep an eye out for volunteering opportunities. The world needs a hero and you can be one!

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Waste, landfill and the lives of waste pickers

By Pratik Bajracharya
Aug 15, 2021

Society’s ways of producing and devouring products create huge amounts of waste. Unfortunately, the rate of production and consumption cannot be stopped under any circumstances, especially for a developing nation such as Nepal. Most of us carry a cynical ‘don’t know, don’t care’ attitude when it comes to waste as we throw away leftover, packaging, and discarded materials. These materials end up at what most people call a dumpsite or ‘fohor fyalne thau’. The actual term for disposal of waste is landfill: an engineered site built far from human civilization to isolate our waste. Nepal has only six sanitary landfill sites. The rest of the waste is dumped on open grounds. During my research on waste pickers and waste management, I visited different cities in the Terai belt to understand the context. The foul smell, scavenger birds hovering, and waste loitering on the pathway easily identified the dumping sites from a great distance. Normally, people would like to stay away from these dumping sites and can’t imagine working here but waste pickers work here every day recovering recyclable materials. They are the true environmental heroes that reduce waste from landfills and contribute to the circular economy. Most discarded materials can actually be sold to itinerant buyers and scrap dealers instead of disposing them which end up in landfills. A waste picker in the landfill usually recovers more than 10 kilograms of useful items in a day working for 8 to 10 hours. Shiva (name changed) is one of the many long servings waste pickers at Bharatpur dumping site on the bank of Narayani river. He starts his day early in the morning and starts sorting plastics, shoes, metals, brass, wires, copper and anything valuable. Though waste picking was initially an urgent job Shiva had to take due to a family problem, he earns more than a 1000 rupees per day from sorting valuable waste. Waste picking is a tedious job with poor sanitation, but surprisingly there was a small canteen set up by a waste picker inside the landfill. One cannot imagine beginning their entrepreneurial journey from such a place but there are more than 40 waste pickers in Bharatpur dumping site and half of them have tea, snacks in the canteen; a smart way to earn besides recovering waste. In Bhairahawa, the landfill is located in Paklihawa on the Nepal-India border besides the Tinau river. Both Nepali and Indian citizens recover waste materials there. Most of these waste workers work these jobs due to the freedom it comes with it and a high paying income. Most dumping sites that do exist lay on the banks of the river polluting the ambient environment. The plastics that we discard mix with the river as they break down to microplastics. These microplastic formations are as a result enter the food chain and the water ecosystem that accumulates onto living beings that consume other living beings causing what is called biomagnification. I would recommend everyone to visit dumping site or sanitary landfill sites at least once to view the mess that we have created, learn how difficult it is manage these dumping sites, and the work of people who are trying to reduce the waste from these sites. Once we know about all the work that waste pickers put in to keep our cities clean, the society will not look down on this sector. Waste picking is a profession with dignity. Without them, our communities would be a huge pile of dump.

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Opening up possibilities amidst lockdown

By Anmol Parajuli
Aug 01, 2021

In the past few years, natural disasters have been a big challenge for Nepal. It invited crucial problems that I wish we never had but as they say, “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger”. We, as humans, have left no stones unturned as we fight for our lives, a second invisible war of its kind in a short span against an invisible threat. What was most important during these times were the feeling of togetherness and willingness to help each other. While I write this, I recall the dark days after the earthquake and the flood. We were recovering from the catastrophes, seeing some positive rays of hope, when yet another calamity came knocking. As the pandemic made its way into our homes, many of us suffocated with pneumonia that came with the coronavirus and couldn’t see their loved ones. While some battled COVID-19 themselves, others had to look after their family members while being infected themselves. Some had to isolate themselves with just a layer of plastic in a single room they shared with the rest of the family in home isolation. The lockdown hasn’t been the same for everyone and it hasn’t been easy on anyone either. Despite our best efforts, many had to face the consequences of incomprehensible losses in lives or businesses. But in these times, the most important thing was having hope, staying positive and stand strong despite the obstacles. The pandemic might have begun with bouts of despair but many served consistently during these tough times to bring the hope of survival. The roads weren’t empty during the lockdown. The ordinary Nepalis paved the way to get out of their comfort zone to provide emergency and urgent relief all while risking their lives. Some drove hundreds of miles to transport resources while others received hundreds of calls per day for oxygen and relief requests. Some worked remotely despite contracting COVID-19 while others prepared meals for the people working. Some donated all they could while others visited remote areas to facilitate people. But whatever we did, we did all we could in our prowess. The words ‘collective effort’ best defines what we did as Oxygen For Nepal (OFN). All the team members braced themselves to come up together to serve. With our supporters and well-wishers from all over the world, we were able to impact many lives. Friends and families from all over Nepal and abroad approached us to serve the severely hit villages and cities. Nights and days of hard work only make sense when we see the lives that have been impacted today. We were able to provide oxygen cylinders, concentrators, food rations, PPEs, and other medical and safety gear to support the COVID-19 patients and frontline workers. With the largest collaboration of the civil society and private sector, we are on our way to install 10 oxygen generating units in different provinces of Nepal. This will help us deal with the third wave to some extent. I cannot ensure if I have saved anyone but I can assure you that my tiny effort has gathered strength in someone to stay alive with our assistance. In difficult times, I believe that it is our moral duty as human beings to help each other. It is the oneness that gives us the courage to overcome the worst plague of modern times. I believe that we still have one thing in common: hope and that hope will encourage us to open up possibilities amidst the lockdown, the possibility of oneness, to save lives, remain strong and come out stronger.

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The pandemic isn't over yet

By Abish Man Shakya
Jul 19, 2021

Before all the chaos that COVID-19 had brought upon us, I put the pandemic and nuclear war in the same bracket; not impossible but probably limited to an action-thriller movie. Since SARS or MERS, the not-so-novel coronaviruses, had not entered Nepal in the past, I had reasons to believe that the mighty mountains had us protected. But the world now is even more interconnected and it didn't take long before the virus infiltrated our country and brought upon the unthought-of nightmare of a pandemic. 2020 was not memorable by any means. I finally had some time to spend with my family but all I did besides that was eat, sleep and repeat it. I called friends and relatives once in a while, played online games with them and I spent plenty of time on classes and workshops. But with time, the COVID-19 situation escalated. Health officials and experts and politicians were all sending out the same message: Stay home! The international news channels kept saying that it was necessary to ‘flatten the curve’, in other words keeping the infection rates to a bare minimum so that the healthcare systems wouldn’t be overwhelmed and collapse. I didn’t know the extent of the damage done by COVID-19 or even feared catching the disease until I learned that two of my parents’ far-cousins had died of the disease. A friend told me how his father had caught COVID-19 and that besides pneumonia that engulfed him, the virus had severely affected his liver. It didn’t make sense to me how the COVID-19 virus was affecting different people differently. Some had it less severe with barely a fever and loss of smell and taste while others were agonizing in pain and fighting for their lives. Soon enough, close relatives of mine caught the disease. Since the lockdown was imposed, we couldn’t reach out and help. To be honest, we didn’t even know how we could help. Even as the lockdowns came to a momentary halt and we were getting used to the new normal, people kept getting infected by the virus. We were now adjusting to a novel lifestyle created by the novel coronavirus but not everyone felt the same way with taking precautions. People hardly maintained social distance or necessary safety protocols in public. One time, I found myself in New Road, and it was crowded just the way it used to be, and half the people weren’t even wearing a mask. There was a misconception that COVID-19 is a threat only to the elders and that it’s merely flu for the youngsters. Some other things that came up in gossip were that there is no point in holding ourselves back since everyone would be affected by the virus sooner or later or the fact that some countries didn’t even impose a lockdown and went straight into herd immunity. Honestly, I didn’t fear for my life because I believed my immune response could deal with COVID-19, but I feared for my near and dear loved ones who have aged such as my mom, dad, uncle, aunts and grandparents. Just as we grew ever so lenient towards COVID-19, the virus made a blistering comeback. The first wave had me worried but we could sit back and treat ourselves with ‘besar-pani’ but the second wave petrified us. Everyone I know was either infected by the virus or knew someone who was infected. The infections were much more contagious and fatal and many people I personally knew died. There was no flattening the curve this time, the healthcare system collapsed. I have many stories, sad stories in fact, in regards to the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. These stories are not of hopeful instances but of incidents of numerous lives lost. I shed significantly more tears in the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Even though I was working in COVID-19 response with Oxygen for Nepal, I felt helpless throughout May and June 2021. I dreaded messages and calls on my phone because I wasn’t prepared at all to hear about another lost life. When someone I knew died, I reminiscence on the fact how our last encounters were so ordinary and orthodox without the slightest indication of our final confrontation. It only taught me the fact that surprise is the nature of death and I should rejoice every moment I spend with anyone. Even when I learned about the death of someone I didn’t know, it still disheartened me. All these people look so happy in the pictures and they were close and important people to someone. It was difficult to see my friends and family bear the brunt of the loss of someone they knew and loved. In July, the situation is better. Through relentless efforts from the government, civil societies and private sector, our health infrastructures have been reinforced. There are more recoveries per day than infections. These are good signs but we still have to be careful because the pandemic is definitely not over. Just as the second wave came back to haunt us, a third wave and many more waves are likely until everyone is vaccinated. The second wave COVID-19 might have doused to some extent but it has not been banished. We will still need to prepare ourselves for yet another wave of COVID-19 that could spread like wildfire and devastate us again. Though things may seem like it’s finally getting back to normal, the war still rages on. That is why we still need to put infrastructures in place such as oxygen generating units. The pandemic isn’t over until everyone is safe. The best we can do now is learn from the past and these experiences. The new normal has no room for leniency. We have to prepare ourselves through prevention, not response so that a COVID-19 catastrophe doesn’t repeat itself. As for now, let us embrace that COVID-19 is here and here to stay for some time, but to suffer less than before, we better be ready this time.

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Occupational Safety Training and Health Camp

By Riya Shrestha, Anmol Parajuli
Apr 26, 2021

The collection of post-consumer waste is handled by the informal waste management sector involving the poorest communities in Nepal. The human resources working in this sector are exposed to occupational vulnerabilities and compromised hygiene practices. Prolonged exposure to hazardous and infectious waste materials, sunlight, electrical and heavy-duty machinery operation, long and uneven working hours, poorly timed and unwholesome eating habits, accompanied by socio-economic and psychological stress are some of the factors contributing to their appalling quality of life. Consequently, they are subjected to higher occupational safety risks and health risks compared to other working sectors. On the occasion of World Health Day 2021 (April 7), CREASION, in support of The Coca-Cola Foundation and Bottlers Nepal (Terai) Limited, organized a three-day Occupational Safety Training and Mobile Health Camp from April 6 to April 8, 2021, with an aim to formalize the informal waste management ecosystem, provide occupational safety training and a free health screening to the waste workers. The training was designed as a part of the Recycler Saathi 2.0 activity component - Strengthening of Baling Center and Informal Waste Workers. The team included a licensed doctor to reach out to a total of 74 waste workers at five different waste scrap centres in Satungal, Teku, Imadol, and Jorpati. The waste workers included young and middle-aged men and women.  The occupational safety training included a session to provide instructions to the waste workers on how to properly use safety amenities such as safety gear - shoes, gloves, mask, reflector jacket and cap, first aid, dignity kits and fire extinguishers, workplace etiquette, and basic hygiene awareness. The scraps centres were also equipped with safety amenities as a means to avoid workplace risks. In addition to that, as an awareness tool, infographics with the name of the scrap centre and basic safety protocols were also provided at each location. The training was followed by a one-to-one basic health screening of each of the participants by Dr. Anuj Raj Kadel through the mobile health camp. The doctor also provided medical and psychological consultations as required. The most common issue among all the participants was high blood pressure caused by daily alcohol consumption, smoking and chewing tobacco. Similarly, few of them complained about back pains and body aches induced by heavy weight lifting, which could lead to problems associated with bad posture. Although none of the trainees were malnourished, most of them had problems caused by dehydration prompted by long working hours under direct sunlight. As a preventive measure, the doctor recommended all the participants get vaccinated for the COVID-19 virus, tetanus, hepatitis A and hepatitis B. The female waste workers were provided with reusable sanitary pads with its instruction to use and advantages. This session also shed light on the lack of knowledge about health care, sanitation, and food habits among the waste workers. Besides training and health examination, the trainers connected with the waste workers to understand their working mechanism, the reason for joining the sector, and their opinion about the informal waste sector. One of the waste workers, Mr. Naresh Rokka said, “The salary that I get here as a waste collector is considerably higher than what I used to earn as a driver. My wife suggests that I stop working as a waste worker because of society’s perception towards waste workers but I don’t see a point in settling for less income because I don’t want my salary to be the reason why my children are denied a proper education.” The training couldn’t be more apt considering the second wave of the COVID-19 virus. Now is the best time for the waste workers to make a move towards full implementation of the learnings to stay safe and secure while working in possible risky situations.  

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Where Do The Children Play?

By Abish Man Shakya
Apr 22, 2021

As ignorant as I was as a kid, I quite enjoyed the holidays on ‘Nepal Bandhas’ while treacherous things happened outside the Kathmandu Valley at the peak of the Maoist insurgency. My parents would happily let me go outside and ride my tiny cycle on the main roads of Sorakhutte. The roads weren't as wide as it is now but riding on the road where cars and motorbikes fizzed past me was a big deal for me. On a usual day, there was always the fear of being hit and run by passing by bikes and cars, but not on this day, not on Nepal Bandhas. It was a different kind of joyous moment for my playful neighbours. The elder brothers would bring out the cricket bat and tennis ball, and put a chair on two ends of the road. They would play cricket on the narrow streets of the capital city and their loud voices could be heard in the silence of noon. They would play from sunrise to sunset but occasionally had their game cut short after smashing a neighbors’ window. Then they would have to find another street to play. As I grew older, I travelled to my friend’s house in Kalanki where an alley led to his house. At noon and in the afternoons, we played football and knocked down bricks and counted them as a goal. Every other month, I observed that new houses were being built. When I first went to my friend's house, I could see the main roads from the roof of his house. But now, his once naturally well-lit room is but a cold dark cave. The other houses assured that no ray of sunlight reaches his room. The narrow alley where we once played football is now a menace to play since there's a parked motorbike in front of every home. Now, there is almost no open ground where I can go and play. I sometimes go to Narayan Chaur to meet up with my friends in the evening but they don’t let you play football there. To get there, I often have to travel on the tar-pitched roads sharing the roads with fuming vehicles. Maybe an open public area somewhere closer to home would have motivated me to get out in the mornings and get some exercise. I can always exercise at home but for me, exercise has to be fun, else I relapse and choose an extra hour of sleep over an hour of physical activity. I remember fondly growing up in a hostel where we had ample ground to play. There is a different kind of joy in coming together to get dirty playing in puddles of mud in the pouring rain. Now, I can only reminiscence on the good old days. I think and wonder that perhaps more people would pay attention to nature if they knew that their right to play has been taken away. The adult generation often claim that kids these days are stuck on their mobile phones but where do the children play? My father sometimes tells me stories of how he used to swim in the Trishuli river and catch snakes in Swoyambhu. I don’t think kids do these kinds of things anymore or are even vaguely interested to do so. Back then when we didn’t have gadgets to play with, we played hop-scotch by drawing lines on soil with twigs. To play the same game now, we have to draw it with chalk over concrete in the parking lots. When we stop going out to play, we do not learn the realities of the natural world. Reality hides in the plain sight of comfort. If we want the kids to care about what happens tomorrow, we should let them go out and discover that joy is real when you share it--that we share this planet with not just with humans but all living beings. It would be wise to give them an opportunity to walk barefoot over fresh green grass. Maybe they’ll encounter a beetle or an earthworm and make them curious about life the way a falling apple intrigued Newton. The lack of space where I stay is saddening. Days often go by when I don’t see a patch of green. We sit back and believe that this is the new normal but civilization is taking away so much space and leaving no room to play. We can only hope that the children today will get more chance to enjoy their youth and simply play.

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World NGO Day 2021

By Sushmita Karki
Feb 27, 2021

Non-governmental and civil society organizations have been strengthening social and civic goals through involvement in extensive array of sectors like education, health, environment, social equality, agriculture, poverty alleviation, and much more. The foundation of such entities have been significant to address social and legal issues globally. In the context of Nepal, the establishment of NGOs date back to as early as 1950. NGOs in Nepal have driven social and political changes on wide and local levels, to develop and support communities. One the major dynamic functions and contribution to community development is the emergency response initiatives of NGOs. The unpredicted impacts of COVID-19 halted several communities, sectors, and blazed existing issues in Nepal, and we witnessed NGOs’ commendable COVID-19 response through strong adaption and resilience. On the occasion of World NGO Day 2021, we acknowledge the relentless efforts and contributions of social organizations and groups for emergency response initiatives during and post pandemic. Volunteer Corps Nepal (VCN), a humanitarian and development NGO, conducted COVID-19 School Safety, First Aid, and Livelihood Program that focused on educating school children about precautions and safety measures for COVID-19 in Saptari. Sano Paila, a community-based organization, commenced a robust COVID-19 response project that provided meals, hygiene kits, and ration supplies to marginalized communities and families. Moreover, Sano Paila also established border rest centers for returnee migrants and isolation centers for COVID-19 patients in Birgunj and Janakpurdham. 100’s group, a social club established by humanitarian volunteers, conducted food, medical supplies, and safety gears relief distribution to communities hit by COVID-19. Established in 2005, CREASION Nepal thrives to strengthen social welfare and community development by prioritizing three pillars of sustainability; economic, social, and environmental. Under CREASION’s COVID-19 response, we initiated Waste Workers Emergency Relief Project (WWERP) with support from The Coca-Cola Foundation, which aimed to ensure the safety and well-being of waste workers by providing safety awareness trainings and relief distribution of food, safety gears, and medications during the pandemic. WWERP successfully reached out to 3212 waste workers and positively impacted more than 16060 beneficiaries in 18 districts of Nepal. Aanand Mishra, Founder and President, CREASION Nepal, “By undertaking the role of implementers, partners, and catalysts, Non-governmental Organizations bridge the temporary gap between state and society with a dynamic modality to deliver aid in accordance with pre-existent and contemporary issues”. CREASION stands at the fore-front to provide relief and support during any crisis in Nepal. Our Emergency Disaster Response Program is a standby initiative for response, recovery, and reconstruction for any type of disaster. Likewise, from natural to man-made disasters, contributions of numerous NGOs in catastrophic situations has abetted to rebuild our communities. On World NGO Day, we encourage everyone to become more actively involved in the NGO sector and foster a greater symbiosis between stakeholders; public, volunteers, private sector, educational institutions, and government through impactful collaboration and partnerships.

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Standing Against COVID-19: Waste Workers

By Sushmita Karki
Feb 15, 2021

Washing, sanitizing, and keeping our hands contamination-free is the primary precaution to protection from COVID-19, but what if it is your job to handle waste directly? During the time of COVID-19 pandemic, waste management has proven to be a crucial public health and sanitation service where public have the privilege to avoid health risks from waste piling and disposal. However, waste management sector in Nepal faces several barriers with low priority from national and local authorities that has resulted into lack of awareness, human resource capacity, technology, advanced infrastructure, and financial resources. In Kathmandu Metropolitan City (KMC), it is estimated that 15,539 waste workers are involved in waste collection, segregation, cleaning, and disposal. Despite of the pandemic, waste workers are in relentless action as front-liners for the community. Already marginalized occupation with low income and benefits, waste workers bear high risks of virus transmission and other diseases with continuous exposure to large quantities of waste. Additionally, lack of proper safety gears, poor hygiene practices and living condition increases health risks significantly. Prakash Shivabhakti, a waste worker since 14 years expressed how he struggled to continue his job with being tested positive for COVID-19 and fear of safety during the pandemic. It also changed his perception towards the importance of hygiene, safety gears, and protection in waste management. Badra Kumari Pariyar, a waste picker from Chitwan struggled to sustain her family of seven members with low income, especially during the COVID-19 lockdown in Nepal. Stagnant economy, unemployment, sealed borders, social distancing, and lockdown caused by COVID-19 in Nepal affected most industries, occupations, and communities. In such situation, Waste Workers are one of the most vulnerable groups that require support from every level of our community. WHO guidelines also suggest that the household generated waste during the pandemic should be tightly packed in strong bags to prevent contamination to waste workers. We can assist waste workers at individual level by following such public health protocols. CREASION Nepal, in support from The Coca- Cola Foundation, initiated Waste Workers Emergency Relief Project (WWERP) that provided safety, medical, food, and awareness relief to 3212 waste workers with a total reach up to 16060 beneficiaries in 7 districts. Furthermore, with the support from The World Bank Group- Nepal, CREASION successfully conducted 5 COVID-19 safety gears distributions to 75 waste workers in 3 districts. Although the relief operations from several private and not-profit institutions are working for the welfare of waste workers, collective action from other contributors at national and local level are necessary to formulate strong policies and provide social dignity for our waste workers. Learn how to support waste workers at communal level by proper waste management through CREASION’s “Safe Waste Management Awareness” video; Safe Waste Management

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Towards Sustainability: Small Actions that Make Big Differences

By Avipsha Rayamajhi
Feb 07, 2021

Sustainability to me is grounding myself to reality. The reality that exists around us. The reality of our growing communities and declining environments. The reality which is a ticking time bomb for the generations to come. More often than not we have been hearing that the earth is nearing its carrying capacity which is to say that the global population is rising but resources are limited to accommodate them. This brings us to the whole idea of sustainability- to use the resources at hand efficiently and effectively so that the present and coming generations can survive well without putting too much pressure on the earth. The implementation of sustainability has broadly been taken as a responsibility of the government and profit- making business houses. This general characterization makes sense given the fact that the operation of industries and factories are a big threat to the environment. Governments always have had to do a trade-off between environment and economic development and the choice mostly has been economic prosperity at the expense of a degrading environment status. However, it’s easy to put blame on higher authorities while individuals and communities succumb to consumerism and unhealthy practices. A sustainable lifestyle if prompted and initiated on an individual level can create remarkable impacts for the environment. Most of us misconstrue the practice to be expensive and unachievable especially in the context of a developing country like Nepal. But facts cannot be more far from the truth than this. If we look around Nepal itself, our rural communities have been a pioneer of sustainable lifestyle even before the concept was popularised by the mainstream media. In an urban setting as well, it is more than possible to practice sustainability through small actions. Here are a list of few everyday changes that one can make in order to lead a sustainable life: a. Segregate your waste: Waste segregation is the basic and the most important step in waste management. The process is fairly simple but helps ensure that recyclable, non-biodegradable waste doesn't end up at the landfill. b. Make your own compost: More than 66% of waste generated in Kathmandu Valley is household organic waste. Such organic waste has great potential in agriculture and farming if composted the right way. Households can invest in a good composting bin and compost the segregated organic waste. The byproduct i.e. fertilizers can be essential for your rooftop vegetable farming or gardens. While you get to enjoy fresh homegrown produce, this also ensures your contribution towards sustainability. c. Reduce plastics: Plastic is pervasive today and there’s no way we can get rid of using it. However, small actions such as utilising a reusable shopping bag for grocery items and buying fresh local groceries not packaged in heavy plastics or reusing water bottles can go a long way in contributing towards a less polluted environment. d. Make it a habit to walk: Walking can seem tedious, especially in a dusty and crowded city like ours. But despite the complications, it is also one of the most sustainable actions that an individual can commit to. If not longer distance, one can at least make an effort to walk to places that are at a shorter distance. Although it can be a little time-consuming, think of all the ways it can truly help you lead a sustainable life. e. Be frugal about your resources: It’s high time we become mindful of our resources at hand. It can start by simple actions such as closing your tap while brushing, reusing waste water for plants, switching off your electronic devices when not in use or buying less clothes. Small actions like these might seem trivial but in the long run it helps towards achieving sustainability. While these are some basic lifestyle changes that one can make for the environment, it definitely cannot be limited to only these. There are a myriad of other small actions that an individual can do from a micro level to achieve sustainability. So, what actions will you follow for a sustainable lifestyle?   (Header image credits: Yummba.in)

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RECYCLER SAATHI: INCULCATING BETTER RECYCLING SOLUTIONS

By Creasion
Jan 14, 2020

The United Nations claims that there are 51 trillion microplastics in the sea, which is 500 times more than stars in the galaxy. This data is an apt representation of the rising problem of plastics that is evidently only getting worse. With growing consumerism and commercialization, it would not be wrong to say that plastics have become an inseparable part of human life. From the food that we consume to the products that we use, all of it comes to us packaged in some or the other forms of plastic. This overt dependence of humans to plastics has increased to the point that it has become an indispensable part of our lifestyle today. With time and with increasing materialism, the use of plastic has gone so much out of hand that what was considered a blessing has become a massive curse today. Plastic waste has been feared as much as climate change and the repercussions of global warming. Out of the various forms of plastic pollution, managing Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) Plastic Waste is a challenge. Although PET bottles are highly recyclable, most of them ends up as waste eventually resulting in massive pollution. It is estimated that by 2021, over 500 billion PET bottles will be produced. Similarly, out of the almost 500 billion productions of PET bottles in 2016, less than half of it was recycled. If the production and consumption of these bottles continue at the expected number with the recycling rate stagnant, their impact only seems to aggravate more. Plastic pollution is a global problem and Nepal is no exception to it. With the increasing purchasing power of people, their demands have also grown. This, in turn, has fostered the culture of consumerism and added to the problem of growing plastic and plastic related productions. It is reported that on average, 100 million plastic bags are consumed in a month in Kathmandu alone. Out of the total urban waste generated in Kathmandu, 16 percent is occupied by plastic waste which implies that 2.7 tonnes of plastic waste are generated daily. The statistics point to the magnitude of plastic pollution in Nepal. Even within plastic pollution, the generation of waste PET bottles is a serious but often neglected issue.   According to a report by GIZ, there are 52 PET bottle manufacturing industries in Nepal that produce 24000 tons of PET bottles annually. To cater to the waste PET bottles produced by these manufacturing industries, there are only 2 small scale recycling centers. Further, it has been reported that 15000 tons of waste PET bottles are generated in Nepal and out of this number, 10-12000 tons of it are illegally exported to Nepal. While the level of awareness among people about the proper disposal of plastic bottles and the culture of reusing it is almost bleak, the waste management mechanism is not impressive either. To cater to the failed waste management and recycling mechanism of Nepal, Recycler Saathi, an initiative of CREASION has been introduced as a first of its kind project that legally exports waste bottles to India through Essel Industries Pvt Ltd., the Nepal unit of the Ganesha Ecosphere Ltd., India. Based on Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model, the project is supported by The Coca-Cola Foundation and Bottlers Nepal (Terai) Ltd.  While the effort will definitely organize the waste sector of Nepal and help in the formation of a legal means to monetize waste PET bottles, it will also substantially help reduce carbon emissions. Recycling 1 ton of PET reduces 1.5 tonnes of carbon emissions which implies that with the target recycling of 3125 tonnes of PET, 4688 tonnes of carbon emissions can be reduced. Carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas traps excessive heat and contributes to the increasing problem of global warming which has damaging impacts on the environment and human life. Hence, the impact of the project is not just received on a macro level but also on a micro-level through the minimization of carbon emissions. The major beneficiaries of the Recycler Saathi project are the informal waste collectors. These door- to- door waste collectors are not guaranteed adequate incentives or respect for the work that they carry out due to the negligence to the waste sector of the country. Recycler Saathi aims to integrate these waste workers into its project by providing them better employment opportunities and social security. The long term vision of the project is to make them capable enough to start their own recycling company that would assist the entire recycling mechanism of the country. Further, the families of the waste workers will also be provided with trainings and skills development classes so that the overall quality of life of the families can be improved for the better. Waste collectors are one of the major players in the war against the mounting environmental pressure created by the increasing activities of humans. The major idea behind the project is to create an organized network of waste workers who are well respected and feel a sense of ownership of the work they do and the purpose that it serves. To provide better services to the waste workers and to improve and organize their working conditions, Recycler Saathi also has plans to tie up with Alliance for Indian Waste Pickers who have already been working in the same sector with the assistance of the Indian government. In addition, Recycler Saathi has already started a supporting project- Waste Smart Club to complement its objective of creating a better recycling culture. Waste Smart Club, created in five different schools of Chitwan engages students in various eco- friendly activities with the purpose of creating a generation of young people who care for the environment.   Hence, Recycler Saathi is a project with a sustainable vision of gradually improving and strengthening the waste sector of Nepal. It not only focuses on the bigger picture but prioritizes all the key players in the waste management sector. The successful implementation of the project guarantees a breakthrough in the recycling business of Nepal along with the benefits shared by not just the environment but the economic and social factors of Nepal as well. With constant and unwavering support from the concerned stakeholders, the outcome envisioned by Recycler Saathi will definitely be achieved for the greater good of the country and the environment.

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GENDER INCLUSION IN CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTABILITY

By Creasion
Dec 13, 2019

The divide between men and women can be seen and experienced in almost everything. Socialization has a crucial role in creating and deepening these discrepancies across genders. Women have mostly been disadvantaged due to systemic oppression and societal barriers that they face in everyday life. Their role in different fields is scrutinized and dictated by various factors- physical, psychological, cultural, social and economic. As a result of various vulnerabilities that they experience, women have become primary victims of climate change and climate change-induced risks and disasters. The underrepresentation of women in various arenas, multiple work burden imposed upon them along with lack of accessibility of resources, education and job opportunities are major reasons why women have become the prime targets of climate change. Climate change impacts on women can emanate in various forms- from agricultural unproductivity, increased work burden, diseases and health to disaster-induced risks and death. With the emergence of the global climate crisis as an issue that is well and fine in front of our sight, climate-induced disasters are no strangers to the world. The United Nations estimates that 80% of people displaced by climate are women. Records show African American women were among the worst affected by flooding after Hurricane Katrina in 2005; 2004 Tsunami in Srilanka, India, and Indonesia saw a vast distinction in the survival of men as compared to woman by 3:1 ratio; 1991 cyclone and flood resulted in five times higher death rate of women than men; more women died during the 2003 heatwave in Europe. The trend of higher death rates of women than men as a result of climate-induced disasters indicates the vulnerability of women. Research suggests that women and children are 14 times more likely to die in a disaster than men. Their supposed obligation to their families and the need to protect them first from disasters puts women in a disadvantaged position ultimately resulting in their death. Further, the sexualization of women’s bodies from an early age and a feeling of shame imposed upon them also refrains women from being rescued from disasters. Similar reasons resulted in the death of many women during the 2018 Kerala flooding. Since the massive inflow of water had deranged the clothing of women, they were adamant to be rescued due to the shame of being exposed in that way in front of people. Such rigid socialization and cultural barriers imposed upon women eventually led them to choose death. Not just death, but post-disaster repercussions for women are also severe. As women mostly act as caretakers of the household and families who do most of the household chores, their exposure to disaster-induced risks is greater. Especially during instances of drought and flood women are forced to travel long distances to fetch water which makes them physically, mentally and emotionally vulnerable. Moreover, the risks increase in emergency shelters where they become victims of sexual assaults, rape, and violence. Further, a report also states that divorced women face more scrutiny during disaster events and are not allowed relief materials post-disaster due to their failure to establish a legal identity for themselves. While various reasons exist behind women being highly jeopardized by climate change, the failure to include them in climate change adaptation measures is a grave mistake that we must overcome. Policies, plans, and programs cannot be implemented for combating climate change without including women- who include half of the world- in decision making. A report on Women and the Environment from the European Institute for Gender Equality states that women and men think differently about climate change solutions. While women agree on changing their daily habits to reduce effects of climate change, men seek for higher alternatives such as the use of electric cars, nuclear energy as an alternative source of energy ­­­­ and a higher energy tax. Women tend to bring empathy and inclusiveness in their decisions which results in a more sustainable outcome. The measures that women agree on controlling the effects of climate change are more realistic, doable and convenient. To mitigate the impact of climate change on women, it is important to include them in core decision making through different channels. The average representation of women in national and global climate negotiating bodies is below 30% which is a disappointing figure. Without the involvement of women, a gendered perspective on climate change and climate change policies cannot be achieved and implemented. The EU states that the failure in including gender dimension in climate justice is due to the fact that women are underrepresented in climate change policymaking and negotiations as representatives of government and civil society organizations. The knowledge and experience of local women from developing countries are equally instrumental in proposing and implementing sustainable solutions to combat climate change. Although women have been portrayed as the victims of climate change if provided the right avenue, opportunity, and platform they can become agents of change. In rural communities, women act as the managers of natural resources and they understand the sensitivity of the environmental issues leading up to climate change. For example, a local community under the leadership of a woman named Constance in Uganda reduced their community’s impact on the environment through replanting trees they once cut down for firewood. The new roots of mango, orange, avocado trees were useful in preventing soil from washing away in flood. As a result, the community experienced less damage from floods and could prevent food scarcity. The local knowledge and experience that women possess must be imperatively considered while framing national and international policies and guidelines against climate change. Therefore, climate change has become a gendered issue today. Gender mainstreaming of climate change policies is required to have a more balanced approach to the issue and combat its repercussions. For this purpose, bringing women to the table, having their voices heard and materializing their experience and knowledge is crucial.

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Youth for Climate

By Avipsha Rayamajhi
Nov 21, 2019

Most baby boomers refuse to believe that climate change exists. Millennials are scared climate change is going to be the death of them. Amidst this tussle of ideologies over the legitimacy of the issue, the one who is suffering the most is our earth. Climate change is real. Denial is no solution to the fact that the world around us, the earth that we live in is in a dire state. The hard-hitting impacts of climate change might not be felt from our high- rise buildings and air-conditioned rooms, but that does not imply the problem is negligible. Time and again, the world has been reminded of the magnitude of climate change. The recent tornado in Bara of Nepal, Cyclone Fani in India, series of frequent hurricanes in the United States of America are evidence that this is a global phenomenon and one that does not discriminate- the repercussions having spread over third- world to first- world countries. Yet, world leaders and the ones with the power to influence have shown bleak sense of urgency towards the issue. Despite a range of massively fancy conferences and treaties over the years, the problem has not been adequately addressed. The youth of today, however, have emerged as the real champions of climate change. They realize the gravity of the problem and are not willing to stay as silent spectators to the chaos that climate change has evoked. They rebel, they protest, they call out world leaders, adopt a more sustainable approach to daily activities and most importantly do not fear to occupy space. They lead by example and constantly remind big corporations and leaders that our future is in danger and quick action is imperative. The activism shown by youth all around the world for climate change has been exemplary. Global Climate Strike is one such initiative led by Greta Thunberg, a 16-year old Swedish school student. What emanated as Thunberg’s symbolic absence from school to protest against climate change in front of the Swedish Parliament gained a huge momentum and has led to a global alliance of youth pressurizing big corporations and leaders to take immediate action for climate crisis. The wave of solidarity among youth has also reached Nepal. A silent rally in support of Thunberg’s global movement was conducted in May in Nepal by CREASION. Further, Nepal Youth Environment Coalition (NYEC) formed by the active volunteers of CREASION along with students of environment science of various colleges brings together environmentally conscious youth with the zeal to work towards the environment and various environment-related issues. The youth group has been actively organizing discussions and interaction programs to integrate a larger network of young people from various walks of life in climate-related dialogues. Hamro Pariyavaran is a talk show by NYEC that brings into light different national and international climate issues through interactions with climate activists and workers. Similarly, a recent session on Climate Interactive Tools with Dr. Bindu Bhandari was a first of its kind climate-related event held in Nepal which worked on Model United Nations approach and emphasized on solving climate-related issues. The workshop divided the participants into different groups known as ‘committees’ who were then assigned the responsibility to provide strategies to cope up with certain climate issues. All the different committees had to reconcile at a strategy that would help meet the agenda. Such workshops are an innovative way to engage youth in problem-solving and generate ideas through mutual understanding and consideration of each other’s positions. Considering the usefulness of this workshop to youth, NYEC also plans to take it throughout Nepal. Highway Clean-Up Campaign is another project in CREASION’s pipeline. With a waste collection of the area between Thankot and Chitwan by engaging local volunteers, the campaign aims to instigate in locals the need for proper disposal of waste- mainly plastics and plastic bottles. Besides, the engagement of youth in the campaign is a good way to integrate them in the movement towards a healthier environment. The long term vision of the campaign is the creation of a golden triangle and expansion of the highway clean- up campaign. NYEC also plans the expansion of their chapters in the ten different locations- Thankot, Naubise, Mahadev Besi, Benighat, Galchi, Gajuri, Malekhu, Mugling, Ramnagar, Narayanghat- that are set for the campaign to form an alliance of like-minded and environmentally conscious youth. Recycler Saathi project that is underway to manage and formalize the waste management sector of Nepal is also beneficial for the environment.   Despite the magnitude and the seriousness of climate change, one encouraging thing that has come out of it is the enthusiasm shown by youth around the world to right the wrongs done to the environment. The level of commitment, amount of care and intensity of passion shown by youth for the environment and to fight climate change is commendable. Such multiple efforts by CREASION to give youth an organized direction and platforms to interact about the sensitive issues of climate change are important and necessary. Youth have the power, understanding, and enthusiasm but they require the right guidance, institutional support and conducive environment to foster and materialize their concern towards climate change. Hence, youth hold the power to bring change and with the enthusiasm that they have, it is likely that they will take the lead in the fight against climate change.

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CIRCULAR ECONOMY: THE SOLUTION TO SUSTAINABILITY

By Avipsha Rayamajhi
Nov 10, 2019

Have you ever wondered about the possibility of your ready- to- throw soda bottles transform into a completely new product? A brand new t-shirt, fleece jackets, sleeping bags, carpets or more bottles perhaps? While the concept of plastic transforming into a completely new product almost seems like a miracle, it is possible and already thriving. You can easily obtain a brand new t-shirt from 10 plastic bottles, a sweater from 63 plastic bottles and a sleeping bag from 114 plastic bottles! Amazing, right? Not just the bottle, but the cap can also be transformed into batteries, storage containers, ropes, brooms, shopping bags, and whatnot. All of this is derived from the outcome of a simple yet important concept of Circular Economy (CE). The concept of the Circular Economy focuses on the regenerative designing of products that would enable continued use of it. Basically, it aims to retain the quality and usability of products for a longer period of time. It entails closing the loop so that the functionality of resources is restored and waste is kept minimal. The current trend of the linear economy works on the culture of use and dispose. The idea behind the circular economy primarily emanated as an antithesis to the linear economy and is derived from the relationship between natural resources and the economy. Economy is fueled by natural resources but the same economic activity eventually creates negative repercussions for the environment by unnecessary waste production. Circular economy intends to form an ecosystem that thrives on long- term use and sustainable quality- one that retains the use of natural resources and reduces waste. Although the concept traces its history from different sources, one of the pioneers of CE can be taken as Boulding who opposed the practice of the existing linear economy and termed it as unsustainable owing to the limitations of the natural system. He introduced the concept of ‘Spaceman Economy’ is contrary to the ‘Cowboy Economy’ and popularised the idea of a closed system with looped resources. Another complementing concept to CE is the Cradle- to- Cradle theory developed by American Architect William McDonough which draws its inspiration from nature. A plant takes up nutrients from the soil, grows and provides nutrients to the surrounding soil from its scattered leaves. It basically works on the principle of the natural system where nothing goes to waste and is circled around for use. The theory has taken reference from biological metabolism and developed the concept of technical metabolism. It considers the inputs or raw materials used in production as ‘nutrients’ which must be returned back to its source for greater efficiency. Here, nothing is taken as waste but rather ‘nutrients’ with the possibility of further use. The theory in line with the concept of circular economy aims to put an end to waste and make resources part of a closed system.   The human civilization and the environment are presently at the helm of mounting plastic pollution. The growing trend of consumerism has fostered throwaway culture. People consume all they can and if they do not require them anymore, there is no hesitation to dump it- ignorant of the massive repercussions of their actions to the environment. To tackle this problem, circular economy can emerge as a relevant solution. Businesses and manufacturers need to revise their business model and make it more sustainable by planning the entire life cycle of their products so that it does not end up in landfills as waste. Recycler Saathi, an initiation of CREASION is a good addition to the increasing culture of circularity in Nepal. The ongoing project aims to refrain PET plastic bottles from ending up in landfill as waste by forming a legal channel for their export. The PET bottles are collected, baled, reduced to flakes and then legally exported to India for repurposing. While the environmental benefit is the primary highlight of the initiative, the economic and social impact is equally noteworthy. Since the PET bottles are legally exported, revenue generation is higher which eventually increases the living standard of waste workers, our Recycler Saathis. In this way, resources after use are not labelled as waste but rather attain a second life and shuffle along the same system. This cuts the production cost of new PET bottles provides better and enhanced employment opportunities for more people and also cuts off unnecessary costs and hassle of managing waste that does not belong to the landfill. The recycling of PET bottles in this way is a win-win for circular economy since it contributes to improving the overall efficiency of the entire socio-economic and environmental system. While initiatives like Recycler Saathi contribute a great deal in the institutionalising circular economy- which is the need of the hour- the baton must also be carried by manufacturers and ensure the supply chain of products inclines to the principle of the circular economy. Similarly, consumers also play an important part in taking responsibility of their actions and being mindful of their patterns of consumption. In this way, ensuring the system adheres to circular economy requires the effort of not just one party but a joint collaboration of various parties involved- be it consumers, producers or third party organizations. Hence, in the wake of increasing environmental problems, growing population, and skyrocketing industrialization it is crucial to consider and modify how we approach our everyday activities. Transitioning to a circular economy can prevent our failing economic and environmental state from collapsing and contribute to the world’s vision of sustainable development.    

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LEARNING BY DOING- MY EXPERIENCE AT CREASION

By Creasion
Oct 16, 2019

Experiencing and learning about new things is important in life. At CREASION, I got opportunities to do so every day through various activities. I had the chance to be part of various kinds of programs such as Trash Tag Challenge, Empower Plus, Tree of the Year, Mental Health Sessions and so on. I worked under CREASION as a volunteer and developed a special interest in the area that the organization works most on which is ENVIRONMENT. One of the best experiences for me was while volunteering in the program, “Tree of the Year 2019”. This was my first volunteering experience through which I learned many things such as making connections, managing time and budget effectively and so on. CREASION has made me realize that helping can be done through various ways and in addition to this it has changed me in a positive way. I am at all times ready to discover myself as well as help people around. I have overcome my ignorance about important issues such as climate change which I am now more aware of and conscious about. With an informal environment, it is easier for volunteers to strike conversations and build a healthy relationship with our supervisors as well. I would like to point out that VFC is an intriguing idea as it is all about engaging young people by fostering a sense of volunteerism. In addition, we also have the opportunity to create our own programs which brings out the best of us. Through my involvement in CREASION and VFC, I gained experiences cleaning our surroundings to striking conversations with government officials. Because of this very organization, I have gained confidence and the ability to speak for the things that need to be addressed. As stated by Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “As we lose ourselves in the service of others, we discover our own lives and our own happiness.” Working in this organization, I got to meet new people and found happiness in helping others. I realized that the sense of achievement after completing a program successfully is incomparable. I am very grateful for CREASION for helping me transform into the person that I am today. Lastly, I am indebted to CREASION for welcoming me and making me a part of this organization.

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REMINISCING MY DAYS AT CREASION!

By Creasion
Jul 30, 2019

If there’s a thing I’ve learned in my life, it’s not to be afraid of taking responsibilities and challenges that come with caring for other people. And it’s a sacred place when you actually get to embrace your learnings and principals. I found CREASION where my strength was explored in an innovative way and I had the opportunity to get out of my comfort zone. I remember the day where we were unknown about what will happen because meeting with Ma’am was inspiring as well as frightening. We initially brainstormed to get factual answers asked by her. From that day, I knew days were going to be challenging and not easy. I believe work can only be completed when one shows courage and hard work, and we volunteer proved it by doing one of the challenging and trending Trash Tag Challenge. I am inspired by the way CREASION pushed me into new work. Volunteering is all about reflecting one’s compassion, unselfish and caring nature, patience and love to one another. Throughout all the sessions and workshop such as Mental Health, Empower+, SDG workshop, Self-Defense, I gained awareness about various issues which motivated me to develop different skills for spinning my own wheels in the near future. I am very thankful to the whole team of CREASION for providing me a golden opportunity and making me capable enthusiastic, conscious and diligent person from an introvert human. Thank you to whole CREASION team for all your effort, support and immense love that you have been showering till now. Thank you for everything.

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MY THOUGHTS ON THE CREASION FAMILY

By Radhika Halder
Nov 18, 2018

My time at CREASION has indeed been remarkable. It is impossible for me to do justice to it through this write-up but I’ll give it a try. When I moved to Nepal, I was fascinated by the country’s rich landscapes and diverse culture. I was also slightly embarrassed to have been living so close (in India) for many years and never having explored this country before. Personally, I love to understand the history, culture and the geopolitical situation of any new country that I visit and it was no different when I arrived in Nepal. Eventually, I decided to work in the development sector that would equip me with such knowledge and understanding in a way that text books never could. This is how I joined CREASION and I could not be more grateful to have done so. As this was my first time working in Nepal, and that too in the development sector, there was a lot that was new and different for me. On joining CREASION, I instantly felt like I found a second home, perhaps like an extended family that helped me integrate culturally and professionally in no time. The warmth that everyone greets you with in this office is truly unique and what I value most about my time here. Moreover, one is always given space here to work on their own and take pride in the projects that they lead. This is once again, not a very common trait in work spaces today. While at CREASION, I worked on several projects ranging from women empowerment to youth entrepreneurship, as well as developing a new website and help coordinate events to raise awareness on crucial social causes such as mental health, women safety, and many others. I also participated in workshops and outdoor activities that helped give me the right balance of practical knowledge and learning, necessary for the work that I was assigned as Lead – Project Development Unit. I believe that the range of work that I was involved with in CREASION has helped me develop and nurture a set of skills that will forever stay with me. As my time here is coming to an end, I know that this is not where our association ends as I will be involved with activities and work from time to time with CREASION and pay visits to this little family I have gained in Nepal.

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ONE MONTH AT CREASION

By Raidha Rafeeq
Oct 31, 2018

I first came to Nepal in September of last year to visit my mother who had been working in Kathmandu. I had originally intended on only staying for a month but ended up spending four months travelling and exploring the diverse landscapes of this captivating country. When I returned home to the Maldives I had decided that I would have to come back again and so I returned a year later but this time with the desire not just to travel but also to learn about and make a positive contribution to Nepali society. After a few weeks of searching, I chanced upon CREASION and immediately took notice of the wide range of projects that they run across Nepal in areas such as women’s empowerment, post-earthquake rehabilitation, youth empowerment, and environment. After weeks of unanswered emails to different organisations, I decided that the best course of action this time would be to go and talk to them in person. Upon coming into the office unannounced, I was immediately greeted by friendly and engaging staff who were keen to talk to me about the organisation and their projects. I expressed my interest in helping out and unbeknownst to me, they had sent out a call for volunteers just the day before! I was set the main task of compiling a grant proposal for the Women for Change – Women for Sustainable Development project. Through my background reading, I learned so much about rural life in Nepal, particularly for women. The project aimed to provide women living in rural areas with income-generating work as despite the fact that they took on a greater workload than their male counterparts with their domestic work, their efforts remain largely unrewarded and the majority of these women were financially dependent on their husbands. I was particularly shocked at some of the statistics I read with 64% of women in Nepal have experienced gender-based violence and 77% of them have never reported it. Another aim of the project was to provide women with access to legal knowledge and resources in order for them to have the capacity to fight for their rights. This is a pressing issue in today’s social and political climate as true progress cannot occur as long as women and girls, essentially half of the population, continue to be marginalised. I was also given the opportunity to attend workshops and discussion sessions on topics such as mental health awareness and sexual assault. These sessions involved a panel of experts and professionals and an audience that comprised mainly of young people. I was pleasantly surprised by the youth turnout at these events and at how engaged they were throughout the discussions. There is a considerable amount of untapped potential within the youth and they possess the ability to make waves in society in terms of social and economic development. Therefore it is imperative to continue having similar conversations in order to nurture an atmosphere of awareness and open-mindedness. Though my time at CREASION as a fulltime intern is coming to an end, I will continue to help out by assisting at different events and by promoting the international volunteer program. I thoroughly enjoyed my time here not only because of the work that I was doing but also because of the warm and welcoming environment that I was allowed to work in. I learned so much throughout my time at CREASION and hope to continue my travels in Nepal with a new understanding and broader perspective of life here.

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Winning Poem of POETRY COMPETITION (IYD 2018) - धनबहादुर उपाध्यय

By Saurav Luitel
Aug 12, 2018

सरकार,म धनबहादुर उपाध्यय,वर्ष २६, M.Sc. Ag गरि आएको छु,स्वाभिमानको पसिना खान नसकेर,तिसौं हजार खर्च गरिGRE, TOEFL गरि आएको छु,हजुर सरकार, मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !! म बाँच्दै गर्दा म भित्रको ‘म’ मर्यो भनेम बाँचे के/नबाँचे के सरकार ?म गल्दैछु, यहाँ मलाई मर्न नदेउ,बरु मलाई बेचिदेउ !हजुर सरकार मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ ! संगै पढेका एक हुल साथिहरुउहिल्यै अमेरिका पुगिसके,साथिहरु डलरमा ‘रकम’ कमाउँछन,र रकममा ‘इज्जत’ कमाउँछन ! गाउँभरी हल्ला चलिरहन्छ,साथिभाइले PR पाएको कुरातीनका बा-आमाले खबर पाउँदासबेरै झिसमिसे हुन्छ,डाँडाको बिचमा उदेकलाग्दो भएर उभिएकोसुर्य पनि एक्कासि यस्तो खबरलेअनुहारमा अद्भूत मुस्कान निर्धक्क बोकेरउनका आगनमा उभिन्छर छेक्नेगर्छ मेरो घरको उज्यालो !घामै नउदाउने घरमा बसेर गर्नु के/नगर्नु के सरकार ?त्यसैले, बिन्ती मलाई अमेरिकि भिसा लगाइदेउ ! दिनभरि खेतमा काम गरि आएकोकिसानको हिलोले खाएको औंलाको काप हेर्दा लाग्छ,खुट्टा भनेको देश हो,अनि कापका घाउ तिमि हौ सरकारहामी किसान त हिलो खाने गर्छौं ,अनि घाउ खुट्टा खाने गर्छ ! लाग्थ्यो,मेरि आमा खुसीको चामल पकाउँथिन,म पसिना सग भात निल्थेबा-आमा मलाई हेरेर खुशी निल्थे ! तर, होइन रहेछ, खुशी हुन त,अमेरिकी विश्वविद्यालयको एसेप्टेन्स लेटर चाहिने रहेछ,खुशी हुन त, हातमा अमेरिकी भिसा र टिकट हुनुपर्दो रहेछ ! खैर, सरकार तक्दिर न होम फर्किउँला/नफर्किउँलायो कुरा यहीँ थाती छाडौंअहिलेलाई, अमेरिका जान नसकेको भन्दैममाथी कमजोर, नालायक व्यक्ति हुँ भनेरसमाजले लान्छना लगाउन अघिमलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !स्कुल देखि विश्वविद्यालयसम्म विदेश जानेयोग्य युवायुवती निस्कने कारखानाबाट तयार भएको मयदि विदेश नै गइदिन भने तिमीलाई समेत अयोग्य भनीयो समाज ठहर्‍याउँन सक्छ !त्यसैले सरकार मलाई अमेरिका पठाइदेउ !बिन्ती सरकार अहिलेलाइ अमेरिकी भिजा लगाइदेउ !!!!! धनबहादुर उपाध्यय

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LETTER TO NEPALIS

By CREASION
Jul 29, 2018

Dear Nepalis, Not to come off as hostile, but what happened to the passion and drive that you showed in posting “Nepal will rise again” pictures just a year back in reference to the April-May earthquakes that brought Nepal crashing down onto its knees. What happened to the sympathy you showered your social media news feeds with? The number of clothes you donated out of empathy? The statuses, the tweets, the news bulletins shared? Have they turned into lame complaints about the government’s inability to take action? For the past two weeks now, my newsfeed has seen large traffic of its posts by international news agencies shed light on the pitiful state of our country’s reconstruction programs. But I think we’d all expected the result of a government-based program that was so heavily funded. So that’s not where the disappointment stems from. Not the local disappointment at least. The ‘problem’ right now seems to be the lack of local – and by that, I mean Nepali, not just based on your geographical proximity – support in the ongoing reconstruction programs being conducted by private NGO’s like Creasion itself. While a few volunteers may pop up from time to time, people arrive on-site only if their friends are coming or if they are promised community service hours. That is the compassionate approach that Nepalis have with regards to helping their own brothers and sisters. That is the attitude that has left us lacking in stark comparison with many drastically developing countries. But the easiest way out is to casually push our responsibilities aside and blame the government. Which as reliable as it is in making use of its enormous amount of funds, is not the only body you should be pointing your fingers at (although four fingers would always be pointing in the right direction) when the blame for a recovery period not up to expectations is brought into the light by media. So I’m not going to bring up what needs to be done now. That should be a common understanding. It should reflect the passion shown in the posts on your timeline from April through June. And if you don’t know where to start, google it, ask your friends, but act on your words. Try to help fulfil your pledge to rise again and we will. If you want to make a difference in the lives of these earthquake-affected villagers, come join us, or any other NGO supporting the cause in making sure Nepal stands tall for once.

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FINAL MESSAGE: 2018 SUMMER INTERNSHIP

By Anika Panth
Jul 27, 2018

Each summer, I come from my home in Washington D.C. to Nepal to visit my paternal family members. This time, I have been volunteering at Centre for Research and Sustainable Development Nepal)CREASION with their Volunteer for Change program in Kathmandu as I mentioned in my earlier blog post. As my time here comes to a close, I have been thinking about the projects I’ve had the privilege to influence and the people that I have met. Due to the fact that I only get to visit Nepal once each year, it’s important to me that I make the most of my time here. CREASION has allowed me to do that by having me participate in a variety of different projects that let me both research in the office and go into and around the city to connect with the people that these projects impact. One favorite project that I have gotten to work on is the PET plastics initiative. For the majority of the first half of my visit, I read and edited documents about the dangers of plastic waste and its significance in the lives of the waste workers who sort through piles of litter for very low pay. I even had the opportunity to visit a private waste site and listen to waste workers talk about their jobs as part of CREASION’s project to honor the workers. Although PET is a highly recyclable plastic, most of it ends up in landfills because people are either unaware or too careless to sort their recyclables from the rest of their waste. CREASION has come up with a plan that simultaneously puts the recyclable plastic to good use and increases the wages of the waste workers. This model allows all aspects of the community to flourish. The quality of life of people that live near waste sites increases, waste workers, and their families have more money, women are given more job opportunities and therefore an income to grant them independence, and the environment is free of excess plastic. This holistic concept is a prime example of CREASION’s values. It is also a reflection of how I spent my time here and a major reason it was so meaningful to me. Although I reached out to CREASION because of my specific interest in the environment, they let me participate in a variety of other projects as I worked on the PET initiative. Along with the plastics project I had the pleasure of working in youth empowerment, female empowerment, and care for the elderly and disabled. I, along with some national volunteers, visited a home for the elderly and disabled nearby the office. As it turns out, a woman there has a son who lives in the U.S. just an hour or two away from me. We spent some time chatting about Nepalis that come to the U.S. for an opportunity, as my father did many years ago. I also spent some time trying the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals into CREASION’s youth empowerment program. Specifically, I looked for ways to implement goals four and five into their program that helps youths learn about relevant technology, write resumes, and prepare for job interviews. This geared the program toward meeting some of the specifics listed by the UN to improve gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls (goal five) and inclusive and equitable education (goal four). One of the last things I got to do was organize and hold a spelling bee for a local school. This was perhaps my favourite outing because seeing the competitive spirit of the kids was really fun to watch, and frankly a little surprising, as I did not expect so many students to have such good sportsmanship. All 36 students took the competition very seriously and earnestly congratulated the winner at the end. This was my final project at CREASION. The fact that I had the opportunity to learn and work in so many different areas made this trip truly unique. I spent a lot of time in the environment sector as I expected, but I also got to learn and experience completely different things. After the devastating earthquake that hit Nepal in 2015, volunteer programs have been instrumental in effecting change. Therefore, CREASION is eager to recruit more international volunteers, and I hope to use my unique position to spread the word about their work back in D.C. Interning in Nepal has helped me find much more meaning in my annual trips to Kathmandu and let me explore my fascination with environmental work. I am sure this will not be the last time I work with CREASION.

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WHAT IS A STRENGTH TO YOU?

By Lunswan Tuladhar
Nov 23, 2017

Is strength holding on when there’s nothing to hold on to? Or is it letting it out for what it is? Or is it expression in the form that makes you feel relieved? Or is it a physical release or exercise of some sort? For me, it is many things. It is me trying to deal with it on my own first. If I fail, then strength means accepting that I am a human and that I can’t keep it altogether all the time. Then I ask for help from my people and my surroundings. That is something I call real courage because for me, asking for help is very difficult. But sometimes, my people aren’t around. And not letting myself be down at the moment is a strength for me. And not letting a guard build up because of it is a strength for me. Think about it, how do you forget all the good things because of this one unfortunate thing? Is it even fair? But on second thoughts, don’t you stop asking for help because this let down one person at a time, builds a wall in you? This train of thoughts is exactly what I conquer, though this process is always a work of improvisation, and is always going on. This is a strength for me. Training my brain to give a chance to people because they are humans is a strength for me. They are humans and so are you. They can make mistakes and so can you. You try and you fail. You fail and you try again, that is how you get up and learn. Being able to practice this is a strength for me. Being able to decide that I will be the better one, no matter how superficial it appears to be is a strength for me. Because at the end of the day, being able to take care of what I require, how I require it, as I balance what is appropriate and what is okay to let go of; isn’t that what builds you? Isn’t that what strength is? So, what makes YOU strong?

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THIS IS WHY YOU SHOULD BE EXPRESSIVE

By Lunswan Tuladhar
Oct 31, 2017

Have you ever been called inexpressive? Has anyone ever told you to be more open about your feelings? Has anyone confessed to you how you don’t show as much as love you say you have? Why you ask? Because feeling it isn’t enough. Feeling that they are loved sometimes isn’t enough, infact, is better when expressed. Because time is not as much as you think is there. That is why, before it gets too late, tell your loved ones how much you value them. Before time and death does you apart, tell them. Remember, these two can’t be reversed. And also remember, all the things you never said will break your heart first, then haunt you forever. They know, so why stress it out so much? Because hearing love in words does magic. The magic that brings faith back and strengthens it. Because hearing love makes you believe you a bit more. The world is lacking energy and love, and expression of it can bring so much of it. Don’t you think so? Get yourself over it and express it as much as you can. Because faith has an expiration date. Even if it didn’t, you shouldn’t take those who you love for granted. You shouldn’t push this person to the point that their faith gives up on them. Yes, FAITH gives up on people. Faith comes above actions. Inactions breed fear. Do you want someone you love fear and question everything that you say you give to them? Do you even love them? If you did, you wouldn’t let them go through this. They are going through this and they are going through it silently. They need to hear this so that they can tell themselves that faith had been restored. Ask yourself, haven’t you ever felt like giving someone a chance who says no to action? Do you deserve that? Now that you have the answer, ask yourself again. Would you like to feel that? So should you be doing this to someone else? Don’t avoid things because they are too hard to handle. Because, maybe, you won’t get a second chance. Don’t let your faith upon a second chance get away. ‘Cause when you lose something that had a place in your heart, you get lost. Don’t lose yourself. Expression matters. It helps. It becomes an energy

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FIRST VISIT TO BURUNCHULI – VILLAGE, SCHOOL, PEOPLE

By Ayashma Tuladhar and Paribu Drew Thapa
Sep 08, 2017

Burunchuli is a small and beautiful village located in Lalitpur, just bit farther then Sunakoti. We had the privilege to visit this village quite recently on the 2nd of September, Friday. We visited the school first in order to figure out our program for the upcoming literacy day on the 8th of September. All the children were more than happy and enthusiastic to participate in all activities they were asked about. They were all very frank and did not hesitate to raise questions and ideas. Soon after finishing the work at school, we headed off towards the houses which were being rebuilt for the villagers after their houses were affected by the earthquake. This program is being conducted by the RFC (Rebuild for Change) program – a joint initiative of Creasion and Rotary Club of Jawalakhel Manjushree. The houses all looked well-built and sturdy; the design was properly thought out as well. The environment was so much cleaner and calmer than we had expected it to be. We saw how the bricks were made for the construction of the houses and we had a go at making a few as well. The process was so easy and quick, and the results were remarkable. All the bricks were made by the women of the village. Being a woman we personally felt soo good to see women out there were self-dependent. Just as strong as the houses were, so were the people of Burunchuli. They were enthusiastic and gave all their hard work for the making of their new houses. Even the elderly were filled with zest and energy. For example, as we were taking pictures of the surroundings and people we asked an old lady, round about the age of 70, to look into the camera for a picture and without any hesitation, she posed like any young girl would have posed for the camera. Our first trip to Burunchuli was amazing, and we surely wouldn’t mind going there again.

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INTERNATIONAL FIRST AID DAY – HAND WASH AND FIRST AID PROGRAM

By Ayashma Tuladhar
Sep 10, 2016

To celebrate the International First Aid Day, we, the VFC Team, accompanied by Mr. Krishna Sharma , in charge of the nearby health post went to Burunchuli to spread awareness on the importance of giving proper first aid which was conducted for the upper grades and a hand washing program targeted for the lower grades of Shree Bhimsen Madhyamik School, Burunchuli, lalitpur . Around 100 eager to learn and enthusiastic students showed up for the programs. We started moving early in the morning at around 8 from the office. It was a very rainy day and we were all drowsy and wanted to snuggle inside our beds with a cup of coffee but once we had a quick breakfast break we were all energized. We reached Burunchuli at around 11 and started the program at around 11:30. We started with the hand wash program for kids by teaching them step by step ways to not only wash their hands for the sake of washing hands but to kill germs.The second part of our program started at around 1:30. We conducted the first aid program for children above grade 5. The children were taught temporary ways to take care of injuries when the hospital maybe too far away. At the end of the program the principal of the school Mr. Aatma Ram Ghimire spoke a little bit about what he felt about the program and some words from his point of view. CREASION also gave them a box of materials that could be used for sanitation which included objects such a disinfectants, toilet cleaning brushes etc.Both programs were led by Mr. Krishna and VFC program Officer. It was an enriching sessions and we received positive feedback from the kids which was our main aim.

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STATE OF YOUTH IN NEPAL

By Ayasma Tuladhar
Aug 08, 2016

I thought I’d write about youths since its International Youth Day on August 12, Friday. We youths have tremendous capacity and the willingness to empower. Primarily, in this day and age of the internet, social media plays a significant role in the participation of youths for social work. People have more information about the different programs going on around them through Facebook events and Instagram posts. This leads to more participation in such events. I mean everybody must have heard of/gone to at least one cycle rally, flash mob, fundraising program or even blood donations done by various organizations for different issues prevalent in the society. However, in spite of the advances in youth participation, there is a setback in the development of the country as a whole because of high migration rates. Relatively larger proportions of the overall migration population are young migrants. All our efforts are being wasted abroad as we are losing young and able human resources as well as highly skilled workers. The lack of education, as well as job opportunities in Nepal, will indefinitely lead to youths lacking the motivation to study here or come back from studying abroad to work here. Nonetheless, that’s for the lucky ones who do get the opportunity to go abroad. There are so many youths who don’t get to go to school due to extreme poverty. As a result of the lack of investment in education and health sectors and the political instability of our country, there are still so many capable youths who don’t even get an opportunity to realize their potential. The condition of our country has relatively improved but we have a long way to go as so many people are still living below the poverty level in dire conditions. Specifically, after the devastating earthquake and the recent floods and landslides, so many people have been displaced, their houses destroyed and lives lost. This might sound very cliché but we are the leaders of tomorrow and it is us who make Nepal greater. We were nourished in this very country for so many years and it’s our duty to give back what little we can. Youths who do go abroad should come back and try to create opportunities lacking in this country because our country needs our help now more than ever.

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YOUTH AND EMPLOYMENT

By Creasion
Jul 21, 2016

Have you ever tried to find a place where you can take your first step into knowing how working actually feels like? Some place where you can gather handfuls of experiences which will help you later in life; but the only offers you see are the ones where you already need a certain amount of experience. If the only opportunities available are the ones that require a minimum “some time” worth of experience, where and how do you ever start? The term “youth” may differ from country to country, as for Nepal the ages ranging from 15-29 are considered as youths. If we follow this definition we come up with the fact that about 30% of the entire population consists of youths. That is nearly half of the economically independent population. One of the main reasons that pushes youths towards unemployment is poverty and lack of proper education which forces them to start working from an early age. These problems mostly are seen in the rural areas. Whatever the condition maybe, if anyone starts working from a young age they will not have enough time to gain the right amount of skills to get good jobs and will have to work mostly at places which give the opportunity for labor work. As for the more developed areas of the country the main problem seems to be that there are too many people who are skilled, resulting in unemployment as well as underemployment. Not everyone will be able to find a job or an opportunity which would be suitable for their abilities. Making it one of the greatest reasons why majority of the youths decide to go abroad and stay there, without a second thought to ever return. It’s a shame to see the future of our country either settling for 3D jobs or staying unemployed because they cannot find any place which would help them flourish. There are so many ways in which our country can choose to develop and so many areas they can find to work on. Wouldn’t it be amazing if those parts of our country weren’t overlooked and were actually dealt with? So why not take the initiative to make our country better. Even when we decide to study abroad, why not come back and start something on your own. Even though it is scary, the shot maybe definitely worth it.

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Debunking Myths: Episode II

By Creasion
Feb 24, 2016

It could’ve been a disaster, it could’ve been the first yet final nail on the coffin of Debunking Myths. “Great program. Can’t wait for the next episode.”“The program was powerful and thought-invoking, everything we’d hoped for it to be and more.”“A great kick-start to the series. Can’t wait for more to come.” Only it wasn’t. This was the reaction we received from the audience, who were much more involved during the debate session than we could’ve hoped for. But of course, we didn’t know where we’d end up when we started. A few hours prior to the event, one of our keynote speakers had cancelled because of an injury she picked up during an unfortunate accident. Well. I panicked. I raced back and forth, up and down, around circles trying to untangle the million knots the news had tied around my brain. A little while and a couple hundred steps later, I drew a couple different scenarios in my head to play the program out as one of the best cases. First thing to do: Confirm the presence of the other keynote speakers a final time. Second thing: Divide the rest of my fellow volunteers into groups to take care of each detail in the program. Third thing to do: Breathe. We’d finally finished setting up. Only that we hadn’t. 12 on the clock and one more hour to go until our audience started arriving. Panic time again? Not really. Between trying to set up the camera in the perfect place and asking the other volunteers to not make a mess of the room they themselves had just cleaned, and trying to arrange seats, and then taking calls from the attendees, panic? Maybe later. I’d already felt myself getting a little under the weather at this point, and by the time we were ready to welcome our keynote speakers and begin the program, I knew I was running a fever. No matter though, because Bhushita Didi helped do much of the work from here. As we tried to balance and coordinate the mediator role, the program begun with our address to the audience regarding what Debunking Myths stands for, and what we look to achieve. The idea is simple, really. Gather, have a few well experienced personalities speak on the topic, and debunk some popular myths in our society, and then move on to a debate session where the audience reveals some of the myths they’ve brought and we discuss a way on how to tackle it. Simple. Mr. Pradip Giri started us off as he explored the ancient myths of our culture and how they still dominate our image of women. For the 15 minutes that he was given, he went about exercising the audience’s minds regarding the topic before he handed over his spotlight to Miss Samjhana Phuyal. Samjhana ji had an intensively thorough presentation, and her own experience revolving around the myths of sexual harassment to share with us. As Pradip ji had done before, she tried to involve the crowd and make it feel as though it was a great place to share, and it was. At the end of our keynote session, during, and even after the debate session were a flurry of raised hands one after another wishing to challenge the myths of today and share their own share of stories regarding right violations. All in all, it was and a success. It really was, given the short space of time the team had gotten to work around the obstacles. We hope the next episode of Debunking Myths is an improvement on this. No. We know it will be.

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BURUNCHULI JOURNAL

By CREASION
Feb 11, 2016

The plan looked perfect on the email, the night before: the creasion team was to assemble at HQ by 6:30 a.m., but of course, things played out quite differently the next day. Although we did manage to gather everyone together in time to reach the village according to our best case scenario following our worst case situation, everything felt rushed and disorganized. We let the situation sink in and worked through that patch as the harmony returned and the team began to tick to its beat. An hour gone, we’d set up the tables, set up the food, cleaned up our stations, and cleaned up our shoes. Now came the hardest part: engaging with the members from Rotaray Club of Manjushree. But me and the rest of the team that’d come from the office today could relax and sit back for a while, for here, Aanand Dai would shield us from questions and inquiries- he knew best. Another hour gone, our wait was finally over. The President of Rotary International was finally there. But there was tension in everyone’s face. Our chief guests had arrived, but from a completely different entrance than the one we expected. After a fair bit of running and shifting, and some time spent regaining our composure, the program was finally underway. As Aanand Dai and Bhushita Didi mingled with our guests, I rushed to the make-shift kitchen with a few volunteers from Rotract to make last-minute checks on our preparations. We were prepared. We began setting up the table around the meeting hall (also makeshift) as the Rotarians flowed in to get a bite of what our program. We watched from aside as the minutes ticked by and the program reached the end of what had been a mentally draining 4 hours. The fact that the sun was right above our heads in a day that promised of being gloomy didn’t work well with the thick layers of clothes we had tied ourselves to. Sweat dripping off our foreheads, we gave a sigh of relief as we took part in the final photograph taken before Aanand Dai and co. left with the guests from Rotary for a presentation. We wrapped things up back in the village, helping clean things up as our stomachs cried “no more.” But we were rewarded for sush-ing our bellies as we were served one of the best plates of Daal-Bhaat-Achaar I’d tasted in a very long-long time. As we stood in the sun to ease up our muscles after a tense 15 minute period of gorging down on the food, we met two of the most cheerful little people in Burunchuli- Sani and Dolma. With them, Lopsang Dai, Sushmita Didi and I played Inti-Mintu London ma and sang the most popular song in Burunchuli- “Simple Simple Kanchi ko” we got a glimpse of how friendly the people there were and got exactly why Burunchuli was always called the perfect pilot project. We didn’t want to, but we had to leave in a while though. The kids asked to be taken back to the office with us but of course we couldn’t risk being jailed for it. So we said our goodbyes and our “until next time”s to Burunchuli and its lovely people and head off home.

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DHADING JOURNAL

By LOPSANG D LAMA
Feb 07, 2016

This is a short extract from our Finance and Admin Officer Lopsang Dorje Lama’s Weekly Progress Report. This week nothing much was done as planned. Sonam had returned from Dhading during the second half of Sunday and went on settling the 2nd and 3rd advance taken for the dhading school project. Next advance was approved on Wednesday and preparation was done to leave for the field visit. At 9 am on Thursday, we head out for Dhading. Shankar’s driving made me feel nauseous for the most part of the afternoon. Part Payment was made to the Cement and TMT supplier; Next payment will be final. Then we had lunch at Malekhu, Prem dropped us at Adamghat and he left. One of the few reasons I decided to go for field visit was that I was enthusiastic to get a glimpse of program officer’s work there. After an hour and half’s hike from Adamtar Sonam and I reached Aamdaada. He probably would have done it quicker without me. Work in progress looked great. All the plastering is supposed to finish on Sunday at Aamdaad and all old labours and masons agreed to volunteer the Sunday’s work. As for Mulabari the work is planned to finish on Monday/Tuesday. I had planned to go to Mulabari the same day, but was exhausted and the nausea hadn’t left from earlier. I hadn’t worn out completely so I decided to leave early next morning. The villager who served food to our program officers daily at Aamdaada apparently went to Adamtar early in the morning so we had to wait for breakfast. The day began late and thus Sonam and I reached Mulabari late. Mulabari’s work looked little slower but it is understandable given the difference in area of the two schools. After returning from mulabari we sat down with Pushpa khatiwada (Tractor/carriage service provider) to discuss about all the transactional anomalies. We had direct approach, had heated exchange of arguments but he didn’t confess anything and was stiff on his ground proclaiming repeatedly to be honest. We couldn’t get any cuts on his pre-agreed rate. I drafted an agreement with him about his involvement in the project. It had to be done because he wasn’t registered service provider and amount of transaction with him was huge. I had planned to return afterwards but it was already late afternoon and I was also tired after walking 45 minutes back and forth Mulabari and Aamdaada so decided to stay the night. Next Day we had scheduled meeting with Block vendor. Issue of 721 block was settled as follows. Total number of Blocks procured for entire project was 4079, out of which 721 was sub-standard. 121 had immediately been returned that same day. Although I pushed on not paying any money for rest of the 600 blocks, weakness on our part was that some of it was already used, so payment had to be made anyway. However, since the blocks were sub-standard and carriage cost involved was our loss, we held it against the block supplier. So cutting to the chase we decided on paying for 290 blocks out of 600. Block vendor have been fully paid. Afterwards I returned Kathmandu. There are so many things to discuss on the “lesson learnt from the project” after Sonam and Kaushal returns however my quick observation on my 2 days’ stay are as follows. – Program officer’s life is rather difficult. Dealing with supplier, mason & labor, sleeping in a not-so comfortable tent for months, having limited option with food, tiring landscape etc. – Our estimations regarding everything was based on “best case scenario”, they didn’t involve considering the other possible factors that could have brought about undesirable outcomes which could directly/indirectly hamper the project’s completion on time. – Life insurance and robbery & theft insurance are immediately needed for those who travel frequently during the project.

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The Power of Volunteerism

By Anubhav
Dec 18, 2015

We all want to be happy in our lives, we feel that happiness can be found through buying expensive materials for ourselves. However, the ancient enlightened souls such as Gautama Buddha has preached that true happiness does not come from materialism. The only way to keep ourselves happy is to make others happy. Volunteerism is an ability  that we acquire at a very early age. We are compassionate beings from nature and we develop altruistic traits as we grow up.Volunteerism is not only the backbone of civil society organizations and social and political movements, but also of many health, education, housing and environmental programmes and a range of other civil society, public and private sector programmes world- wide. It is an integral part of every society. There are somethings in our lives that we do from our heart. Volunteerism comes from within and is not influenced by external factors. Compassion can be defined as the ability of a person to empathize with someone else’s pain and suffering. Its the ability to walk in someone else’s shoes. One of the most powerful ways for youths who are trying to pursue a career in their lives is to understand and experience the type of leadership needed for the future jobs is to do volunteer work early in their careers. This is because the type of leadership at the top is akin to being a leader of volunteers, it is not about carrots and sticks but about persuasion and getting people to grasp and follow one’s vision. Volunteering is the perfect vehicle to discover something  a person is really good at and develop a new skill. As Mahatma Gandhi said, “Live as if you were to die tomorrow.  Learn as if you were to live forever.” It is never too late to learn new skills and no reason why we should stop adding to our knowledge just because we are in employment or have finished education. Planning and implementing a major fundraising event can develop goal setting, planning and budgeting skills. Supervising and training other volunteers helps to develop supervisory and training skills. These are examples of skills that can enhance a career but we don’t have to develop skills with the intention of facilitating our career. Painting a mural or making banners for International Volunteer Day – to celebrate the wonderful and priceless work that volunteers do – could gently push you to discover graphics and art talents. In essence, Volunteerism lies at the hearts of people who are passionate about something and it is certain that the power of volunteerism will be strengthened and shine through in the years ahead.

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Volunteer Stories

By Creasion
Dec 18, 2015

Marie Jones, Canada; Thank you Creasion  for the amazing experience in Nepal! I felt right at home! I am sad that I have to leave so soon. But I promise that I will be back soon. I am also quite happy that I am returning home with a lot more experience and energy; feels like it is totally different me. Jennifer Losie , CanadaI; I just wanted to say thank you for everything that each and every one here has done to make my experience in Nepal absolutely amazing. I truly appreciate all of the hard work that went into making my stay unforgettable. You will be sincerely missed. Audrey Sydora, Canada; Thank you Creasion  for an amazing experience here in Nepal. I will miss you all dearly. I hope that this is not where our ways have parted, but this is where our ways connected; Creasion has been a junction.   Danielle Smith; Words cannot describe how thankful I am for the amazing enriching experience that you have gifted me. With Creasion , this strange city was not strange at all; I felt like I had a deep connection with you and this mystical land. Thank you all very much for making my time so awesome!   Laura Hähnel, Germany; “The time in Nepal was an experience that I think I will never forget. To get to know another, very different culture than the one you live in is fascinating! To smell different scents, to get to know about other culture and their habits than the one you are used toEverything was new for me and with colorful impressions. And the work with the children was great as well. To see how they slowly get to trust you, how they laugh and play. And last but not least all the kind people from the Creasion who are there for you while you are in this different country… This work experience was something very special and I am grateful that I had the chance to do it.”   Eline Zumholte, Germany; I have been in Nepal for one month- a far too short time to learn enough about this wonderful and interesting country and people. During my stay i was busy in a school with HIV- infected children with whom I worked almost every day. Learning with and from the kids was a very positive experience. Leonard Gunther; My name is Leonhard from Germany, I am 18 years old and I did my work experience in a school for HIV infected children in Nepal. In this following text I will describe my work and experiences in Nepal. To begin, I want to outline how I got the idea to do my work experience inin Nepal.First of all I read an article in a magazine about four german girls who have done this work experience before. I was very fascinated about their work in a school for HIV infected children. Furthermore, I was and I am very interested to help other people. So I decided to do the same.   From the beginning of my work experience the people were very friendly. I arrived in the holiday time, so there was no school for one week. In this time the people in the accommodation took me to different places in Kathmandu so I saw many holy places. Furthermore the people taught me about their religion and culture. Besides, we sometimes ate in typical local Nepali restaurants, so you can delve into the Nepali culture and on this way you will get to know the real Nepali food. I am of the opinion that it is very nice to know the food of an unknown country. A further and a very important point is that the people from the Creasion in Nepal helped me with every formal things like changing money or getting a SIM Card for the cell phone. I think that is very important in an unknown country. You will enjoy the time in school, the kids are very cute and thankful that you come from another country. In the lessons you can play many games, but it is important that you create your own games because thereby the kids will receive personal ideas of you. The school is located outside of Kathmandu and the environment is very peaceful. Every morning you will go to the school by motorbike or with the bus. If you like you can also go to other places for work where you can teach other children. That can be a very interesting alternative. If you want, the people from the organisation will take you to a Jungle Safari in a National Park. For me it was the first time in a jungle and I saw many different animals while I rode an elephant. When you come to Nepal as a volunteer, I would say that you have to do this very nice trip to the National Park. The accommodation is a very good place, you have an home stay feeling there. In the accommodation you always have somebody who will take care of you. The rooms are very comfortable and cosy. You will get the food in the accommodation, and it is very tasty and if you want you can use the kitchen to cook your own meal. Also it is an important point that the accommodation is not far from the city so that you can go out alone to buy something In brief, I can say that this work experience is full of new, interesting impressions, so if you are interested in helping other people, you have to go to Nepal. I am convinced that you will gain many new experiences.

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CLIMATE CHANGE: HOW IT AFFECTS NEPAL

By CREASION
Jan 08, 2015

One might be forgiven for thinking that the International Summit being held in Paris concerns the terrorist situation that is ISIS, the discussions being held are for a problem that has been extant long before the terrorist organisation had taken its first steps. Climate Change has been an inexorable wave that has been tailing us since the 19th Century, and even though it has been the topic for much debate and even more research, a one-size-fits-all solution hasn’t yet been promulgated. While in fact, one-size-should-fit-all is what should be put in play at the moment, it hasn’t been a very popular idea- despite the gravity of the situation. With the COP 21: Climate Summit in Paris finally edging towards a deal to reduce (notice how it’s reduced and not reverse) the effects of industrialisation, some of the key arguments being made for and against a worldwide overhaul, highlight the different perspectives and understandings of the situation as people see it. Some think that there are more taxing matters waiting to be dealt first, some think that it’s unfair on developing countries that they need to cut down on their use of fossil fuels, others mainly support the idea of change, but are unsure of its extent. But let’s get to the main questions the article is trying to ask in the context of our own environment: Where does Nepal stand in this, and if the answer isn’t so straightforward- Where should Nepal stand in the face of Climate Change? Nepal, being one of the most climate-vulnerable mountain LDC, has been actively engaging itself in implementing actions to adapt to the changing climate, as well as leading from the front as a Chair of the LDC Coordination Group, for 2013, and 2014. According to Eco Experts, a group focused on following, and trying to limit -if not reverse- Global Warming, Nepal’s Green House Gas emission is less than 0.027 percent of the total global emission, it doesn’t have much to contribute in the way of limiting the effects of changing climate, but rather should brace itself, and has been doing all it can to try to adapt. For this, Nepal steady itself, because as stated earlier, we are vulnerable, and studies have shown that though Nepal might not turn into another Venice just yet as the situation in Venice is grave and Nepal is far cry from facing such situation, if the temperature continues to rise by 2°C, by 2050 water availability will be too low to produce our own food. Life might seem grinding without fuel, but try living without food. So then, another question arises: are we doing enough or is it all just show? Well, that is for you to decide, because the contribution of each individual living in a country matters if they are to truly adapt to the harsh changes in lifestyle we might need to brace ourselves for.    Remember, only we can be our own saviors.   Picture source: Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tbrittaine/11907391365

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